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Thursday, February 18
 

2:00pm CET

Keynote Session - TBA
TBA


Thursday February 18, 2021 2:00pm - 2:40pm CET
Main Stage

2:45pm CET

NodeJS, ML, K8s and Unethical Face Recognition
How nice would it be to be able to remember everyone's name? What if you could just walk into a room and know everyone's Twitter handle? Kubernetes is a great tool that is being used more and more for deploying applications, and it can also be used in the context of machine learning. In this talk, the speaker will demonstrate how to use NodeJs, a touch of machine learning and a sprinkle of Kubernetes to recognize people in a crowd.
With a demo inspired by the Black Mirror series, the attendees will learn how to use openly available tools to do face recognition with NodeJs and how to deploy multiple microservices to Kubernetes.

Speakers
avatar for Joel Lord

Joel Lord

Technical Evangelist, Auth0
Joel Lord is passionate about IoT, AI, JavaScript and the web in general. In his spare time, Joel shares his findings via his blog Javascript Everything.He is currently a Technical Evangelist at Auth0, is a part-time teacher at the Algonquin College in programming and is involved in various developer communities of the Ottawa-Gatineau area. He is also involved with OSMI, which helps to fight the stigma around mental health issues in... Read More →


Thursday February 18, 2021 2:45pm - 3:25pm CET
Session Room 5

2:45pm CET

Lessons Learned: arc42 in a Real Devops Team
In this presentation, the speaker will talk about his experiences, successes and failures with the arc42 architecture template in a DevOps team in a corporate environment with a product development focus.

Product development is often characterized by short iteration cycles and is therefore often operated in an agile manner, as in the speaker's team. There the existing unstructured documentation was transferred to the arc42 template and stored in a wiki. In the course of time, it turned out that tooling plays a decisive role for the quality of the documentation and therefore switched to Docs-as-Code.

In the course of the presentation, the most important decision points for the current iteration of the technical software architecture will be discussed. These include the handling of 'developer prose', outdated documentation and the architecture decisions that are particularly important for a DevOps team. The integration into the methodical procedure Kanban was made possible with arc42 and a microsite based on AsciiDoc.

Not left out are the mistakes made, such as missing quality assurance of created documentation or the mixing of business and technical topics.

Speakers

Thursday February 18, 2021 2:45pm - 3:25pm CET
Session Room 3

2:45pm CET

Narayana: Java library for transaction processing
Narayana could be known as JTA transaction manager used in WildFly and Quarkus app engines.
But this is not the only capability that Narayana offers. This talk shows the variety of transaction processing abilities
that the Narayana library offers. You can expect to learn a bit details on the JTA processing, brief touch on JTS,
example of XTS, RTS, STM and maybe LRA.

Speakers
avatar for Ondřej Chaloupka

Ondřej Chaloupka

Developer, Red Hat
I'm a developer at WildFly team, working on project Narayana - transaction manager integrated with WildFly, Quarkus and other Red Hat projects.


Thursday February 18, 2021 2:45pm - 3:25pm CET
Session Room 6

2:45pm CET

Build an e2e analytics application using DataHub
In this talk you will learn how to build an end-to-end analytics application using (almost) only jupyter notebooks as the basic unit of development.

When developing AI driven applications, there is often a friction point in the development life cycle when porting your code from a Data Scientistโ€s experimental notebook into the production ready code a Software Engineer expects. What if we could find a solution to this issue, and let the notebooks themselves be run in a DAG workflow, connected to each other, allowing them to share and exchange data and avoid this porting step all together, making it simpler for data scientists and software engineers to collaborate and quickly iterate on their AI driven application?

We will walk you through a case study where we did just that. Using the Open Data Hub toolkit, specifically: Jupyterhub, Ceph, Hive, Hue, Superset and Argo on Openshift, to build a recurring email list analytics and dashboard application. Highlighting some pitfalls we made along the way, how we could improve in the future with Elyra and how this process is general enough to be applied to many AI driven application development use cases.

Speakers
avatar for James Clifford

James Clifford

Senior Data Scientist, RH - Boston
Senior Data Scientist at Red Hat working in the Office of the CTO on AI Ops.
avatar for Tom Coufal

Tom Coufal

Senior Software Engineer, Red Hat
Tom is a senior software engineer working on analytics and big data processing for Ansible and Red Hat Cloud Services. He started in Red Hat 5 years ago and during the years he had the opportunity to experience many different fields in software engineering. From QE to DEV, from backend... Read More →


Thursday February 18, 2021 2:45pm - 3:25pm CET
Session Room 2

2:45pm CET

Mathematics and development of fast TLS handshakes
Tempesta TLS is an implementation of TLS handshakes for the Linux kernel. Since the kernel already provides symmetric ciphers, we focus on asymmetric cryptography only, elliptic curves in particular.

Use used the mbed TLS library as the foundation and almost fully rewrote it to make is x40 faster. During our development we also use parts of WolfSSL library. While WolfSSL outperforms OpenSSL, it uses the same algorithms, which are 5-7 years of old. Tempesta TLS uses newer and more efficient algorithms from the modern cryptography research.

While we still improving performance of Tempesta TLS, the implementation already establishes 40-80% more TLS handshakes per second than OpenSSL/Nginx and provides up to x4 lower latency in several tests.

This talk covers following topics with plenty of benchmarks:

* The fundamentals of elliptic curve computations and the most "hot spots"

* Side channel attacks (SCA) and methods to prevent them

* How the recent CPU vulnerabilities impact TLS handshakes

* Basics of the new fast algorithms used in the Tempesta TLS

* The design trade offs in OpenSSL, WolfSSL, mbed TLS, and Tempesta TLS

* The funny assembly code with is more straightforward than C


Thursday February 18, 2021 2:45pm - 3:25pm CET
Session Room 1

2:45pm CET

Inside the UDS deduplication index
The UDS index is at the center of the deduplication capability of the
dm-vdo device mapper target. The UDS index holds the metadata that
allows dm-vdo to find duplicate blocks quickly with minimal storage
overhead. The index is highly optimized to take advantage of common
properties of real world data sets. This might be useful in other data
processing environments besides block storage as in dm-vdo.

This presentation will explore the inner workings of the UDS index and
the tradeoffs that lead to effiency but also determine what it can and
cannot do.

Speakers
JW

john Wiele

Senior Developer, Red Hat
Software developer since time immemorial.


Thursday February 18, 2021 2:45pm - 3:25pm CET
Session Room 4

2:45pm CET

Building Smaller Container Images
Red Hat helped pioneer the concept of a Linux distribution, now we're working on how to get rid of it... OK, you're paying attention, right? Technically, we're trying to shift the problem of managing the distro to Red Hat so that you don't have to worry about it. Distroless container images can be tiny because they don't include package management tools like RPM and DNF, but still provide users needed software like glibc, openssl, and httpd. Cloud is just somebody else's computer, Serverless is just somebody else's server, and Distroless is just somebody else's Linux distro.

In this talk, we'll analyze the dependencies in container images using rpm-show, and explain how work is constantly being done to make container images smaller while still providing battle tested, pre-built software that is convenient to consume.


Thursday February 18, 2021 2:45pm - 3:25pm CET
x Workshop Room

2:45pm CET

Diversity and Inclusion Meet up
An opportunity for everyone who attends DevConfcz who is interested in the topic of Diversity and inclusion to meet up, talk about some of the changes and challenges over the last year in the D&I landscape and get to know each other a little.

Speakers
avatar for Imogen Flood-Murphy

Imogen Flood-Murphy

Manager, CEE Operations, Red Hat
I'm a long time Red Hatter, working in the support organisation for my entire tenure, talking to customers and about their issues. I also love talking about all things Diversity and inclusion, and what we can do to be better.


Thursday February 18, 2021 2:45pm - 3:45pm CET
x Meetup Room

3:30pm CET

Hybrid Cloud - nothing to worry about! 🌥️
The cloud has won. AWS/Azure/GCP are the new golden standard for infrastructure.

This talk is for both engineers
and architects wondering whether they use public clouds for their real strengths or just because
that's what they're used to. I'll go through real world examples of successful hybrid cloud deployments and their
cost-benefit analysis. In some cases, the cost difference is in hundreds of percent. The money
you could reinvest into your people or other parts of the business.

You may wonder how much harder or different managing bare metal servers really is. The second
part of this talk will be focused on practical design and operation of a hybrid approach for
a small to mid-sized company.

If you're a developer, you may come also for the demos of how management of bare metal servers
looks like in practice and what you need to do differently than with your cloud provider.

Speakers
avatar for Filip Sedlak

Filip Sedlak

Head of DevOps, Twisto
Filip studied cheminformatics and worked on software for big pharma companies. Later, he cofounded NeuronSW, a machine learning startup. At the moment, he helps companies to reduce friction in their development processes. His DevOps tools are automation, focus on APIs and decentralization... Read More →


Thursday February 18, 2021 3:30pm - 3:55pm CET
Session Room 5

3:30pm CET

ACME: Certificate management has never been easier
The Automatic Certificate Management Environment (ACME) protocol makes it possible to obtain certificates from a certificate authority instantaneously without any human intervention. Developed and used by Let's Encrypt, a free and open-source certificate authority, this protocol has greatly simplified the once complex process for obtaining and managing server certificates. Since this protocol became an IETF standard a little over a year ago, more certificate authorities are now looking to implement this protocol. In this session, we'll first give an introduction to the ACME protocol and how it works. Then, we'll take a look at a Java ACME client that has been integrated in the WildFly application server and we'll demonstrate how to easily obtain and manage server certificates for WildFly from Letโ€s Encrypt or any certificate authority that implements the ACME protocol. By the end of the session, you will understand the benefits of the ACME protocol and will never need to worry about forgetting to renew your server's certificate ever again.

Speakers
avatar for Farah Juma

Farah Juma

Principal Software Engineer, Red Hat
Farah Juma is a Principal Software Engineer at Red Hat where she co-leads the WildFly Elytron project. She has been focusing on application server security for almost 6 years.


Thursday February 18, 2021 3:30pm - 3:55pm CET
Session Room 6

3:30pm CET

Share data without revealing personal information
Deep learning and machine learning more broadly depend on large quantities of data to develop accurate predictive models. In areas such as medical research, sharing data among institutions can lead to even greater value. However, data often includes personally identifiable information that we may not want to (or even be legally allowed to) share with others. Traditional anonymization techniques only help to a degree.

In this talk, Red Hat's Gordon Haff will share with you the active activity taking place in academia, open source communities, and elsewhere into techniques such as differential privacy. The goal of this research and ongoing work is to help individuals and organizations work collaboratively while preserving the anonymity of individual data points.

Speakers
avatar for Gordon Haff

Gordon Haff

Technology Evangelist, Red Hat
Gordon Haff is Technology Evangelist at Red Hat where he works on emerging technology product strategy; writes about tech, trends, and their business impact; and is a frequent speaker at customer and industry events. Among the topics he tries to keep up with are DevOps, IoT, blockchain... Read More →


Thursday February 18, 2021 3:30pm - 3:55pm CET
Session Room 2

3:30pm CET

Go Write Tests using Pragmatic Best Practices
Tests are written to assure the correctness and quality of the solution they examine.
Engineers write tests at different stages of the development cycle, starting at unit tests up to e2e tests.
In fact, for every line of production code, multiple lines of test code is written.

Writing tests is no different from writing production code. In order to keep it running correctly and assist in detecting issues, it needs to be written in a way that can stand the test of time, provide the needed information on failures and be maintained for the project lifetime.

This talk presents test best practices which can be applied at all test stages.
The practices are focused to help write good tests and provide the needed information for debugging and troubleshooting the issues detected.

While each language and test framework may present different properties and challenges, the practices are agnostic to a specific language/tool.

Examples will be given in Golang using Ginkgo/Gomega and in Python using PyTest.

The talk will cover:
- Test structure
- Test isolation
- Test fixtures vs test body
- Assertion
- Traceability
- Shared resources
- Dead test (code)
- Skipping, xfailing or not running
- Parallel tests

The talk is based on the following blog post: https://ehaas.net/blog/tests-best-practices/

Speakers
avatar for Edward Haas

Edward Haas

Sr. Software Engineer, Red Hat
Software and Networking specialist, currently focusing on virtualization and container technologies. Experienced with data path optimization and acceleration.Consider code as an art and keeping it clean as a must.Maintainer of oVirt networking, its system tests (OST) and the new nmstate... Read More →


Thursday February 18, 2021 3:30pm - 3:55pm CET
Session Room 3

3:30pm CET

Using NGINX as a CDN for Ceph Radosgw
Ceph is a distributed unified software-defined storage solution often used as a S3 Object Storage backend using Ceph RadosGW.
NGINX configuration is used in order to cache Ceph RGW objects at the NGINX layer, and offload intense workloads in a secure way, as NGINX is a performant web service.


Thursday February 18, 2021 3:30pm - 3:55pm CET
Session Room 4

3:30pm CET

oVirt monitoring with Grafana & advanced options
In this session, participants will get an overview of the new oVirt monitoring feature with its data warehouse (DWH) and Grafana, architecture and demo.
The session will also cover the option of creating new dashboards based on the oVirt DWH schema.
For creating new dashboards, attendees should be familiar with SQL querying.

Speakers
avatar for Shirly Radco

Shirly Radco

Principal Software Engineer, Red Hat
Shirly has been working at Red Hat for the past 6 years, as the maintainer of oVirt Metrics and DWH.


Thursday February 18, 2021 3:30pm - 3:55pm CET
Session Room 1

3:45pm CET

Quarkus Hands-on Workshop for Spring Developers
This workshop is designed to be hands-on experiences on how to refactor existing Spring Boot apps(i.e. Petclinic) to Kubernetes-Native apps on Quarkus for Java developers. The workshop covers Spring Web, DI, Data, JPA, and Cache refactoring practices. Lab participants don’t need to install any tools & software ahead of time. Instead, they will use CodeReady Workspaces(Web IDE), Spring & Quarkus runtimes, and OpenShift(Kubernetes) 4 for a deployment infrastructure.

Speakers
avatar for Daniel Oh

Daniel Oh

Principal Technical Marketing Manager, Red Hat, Inc.
Daniel Oh is a principal technical product marketing manager at Red Hat and works CNCF/DOIS ambassador as well. He's well recognized in cloud-native app dev, senior DevOps practices in many open source projects and international conferences. Recently, he continues to evangelize enterprise... Read More →


Thursday February 18, 2021 3:45pm - 4:25pm CET
x Workshop Room

4:00pm CET

Break
Thursday February 18, 2021 4:00pm - 4:30pm CET
Main Stage

4:30pm CET

OpenShift in your own backyard
OpenShift in your own backyard
Installing OpenShift on your servers with Assisted Installer

OpenShift Container Platform is an open source enterprise-ready Kubernetes container platform.
There are multiple ways to use OpenShift, including in cloud provider environments such as Amazon Web Services, Google Cloud Platform or Microsoft Azure or on your own infrastructure like RHV, Openstack or Bare Metal.

Installing on bare metal servers or virtual machines can sometimes be hard. Having the ability to easily install OpenShift in your data center helps increase the productivity of the IT and Development teams.

The Assisted Installer is a SaaS solution that introduces a new way to deploy a new OpenShift cluster on bare metal basically by only booting the nodes that will be part of the cluster, with an ISO generated by a service hosted in cloud.redhat.com. The service will orchestrate the needed steps based on the user parameters and report about the installation progress. All that without the need of an additional bootstrap node.

In this session, we will explain about the Assisted Service flows and what are the network and hardware requirements, and the needed inputs from the user. We will discuss all the customizations available to the user, and about the possibility of running the Assisted Installer in a disconnected environment. Finally, we will do a demonstration showing how all come together to a running OpenShift cluster in your own backyard.
https://cloud.redhat.com/openshift/assisted-installer/clusters

Speakers
avatar for Freddy Rolland

Freddy Rolland

Principal Software Engineer, Red Hat
Freddy is a Principal Software engineer, currently working at Red Hat's OpenShift KNI edge group. Before that, he was part of RHV and OpenShift Virtualization Storage Team.Beside coding, Freddy has a great interest in education, teaching middle school students about Linux and Python... Read More →
avatar for Nir Magnezi

Nir Magnezi

Red Hat
Nir is a Senior Software engineer, currently working at Red Hat's OpenShift KNI edge group.Before that, he was part of the OpenStack Network and Load Balancing team.https://github.com/nmagnezihttps://twitter.com/nirmagnezi https://www.linkedin.com/in/nirmagnezi... Read More →


Thursday February 18, 2021 4:30pm - 4:55pm CET
Session Room 5

4:30pm CET

Years of fun as remote manager of remote workers
10 years ago I've joined Red Hat working on a very internal technical subsystem of our middleware application server. What was crazy for family and friends has been I started working from home. One hundred percent of my time. Mum was saying "You will turn mad!". 10 years later I'm still a 100% remote worker, with the role of Manager of Software Engineers of a team distributed all over the world.
The talk will focus on how open source, open management practice, and the right mindset permitted me to have a lot of fun, all over these 10 years of remote working and remote management.

Speakers
avatar for Stefano Maestri

Stefano Maestri

Principal Software Engineer and Associate Manager, RedHat


Thursday February 18, 2021 4:30pm - 4:55pm CET
Session Room 3

4:30pm CET

Automating maintainers work: The Prototype
Ever wondered what can be done for automating Fedora packaging? In this case Ruby Gems packaging. I've created the tooling to update, monitor,
test, and push updates in to Fedora, all in an collaborative way (PRs).

What simply started as a way to repeat identical tasks became set of tooling. Although individual tools are highly configurable, all are written with a specific purpose in mind
(do one thing well), and can run in an automated way. I've those up to run on all Fedora rubygem packages, therefore helping with automating package updates (well, apart from the conflicts...). While also doing some proactive testing with packages yet to be updated.

I'll introduce the general approach, and how the respective tools are integrated. I'll briefly describe specific toolings use-cases, show demo of
the tooling altogether, and workflow for resloving conflicts.

All tools are CLI based, standalone, and minimalistic. If a part of it seems unfit, it can be easily re-written (or replaced with other tool), therefore "The Prototype".

Suggestions are welcome.

Codebase:
TBD (currently internal)

Speakers

Thursday February 18, 2021 4:30pm - 4:55pm CET
Session Room 6

4:30pm CET

The Trial - GraphQL streaming with Kafka
Are you interested in Data Streaming, GraphQL or Event-Driven Frontends?
Join us to become a jury and explore best patterns for building event-driven, full-stack applications.
Talk is going to explore software patterns for building end-to-end streaming applications using GraphQL and Apache Kafka.


Speakers
avatar for Wojciech Trocki

Wojciech Trocki

Red Hat
Full-stack software engineer working with Java, Golang, Node.js, and Kubernetes.Passionate about API design (OpenApi, GraphQL), open-source software, productivity tools, and building software frameworks.


Thursday February 18, 2021 4:30pm - 4:55pm CET
Session Room 1

4:30pm CET

Beyond Inference: Bringing ML into Production
Exploiting the business value of data science doesnโ€t end with training a Machine Learning model โ€” in fact that is just the beginning. Data scientists want to maximize model performance while application developers want a deployment that builds repeatably and behaves predictably. Model serving smooths the transition from data science to applications in production. This talk will explain what model serving is, who should care, and show participants how to use the open source model-serving project, Seldon Core, to serve models on Kubernetes.

This session is told from a data scientist's point of view and documents building a model serving pipeline as a whole. This includes pain points of model serving such as clunky pipelines, but also celebrates the parts that work well, such as scalability within Kubernetes.

The audience will learn: the basics of model serving, why this is a relevant issue, how model serving offers relief for the data scientist/software engineer handoff, and know how to deploy their machine learning model with Seldon Core.

Speakers

Thursday February 18, 2021 4:30pm - 4:55pm CET
Session Room 2

4:30pm CET

Keep calm and store your data in OCS
Your data is the most critical resource in your OpenShift/K8s cluster: without it you cannot continue to function or serve your customers.
OpenShift Container Storage (OCS) protects your data by addressing three difficult problems: high availability, backup, and disaster recovery. OCS is an OpenShift operator based on Rook and Ceph that provides cloud native software defined storage for your applications, and is fully integrated into OpenShift.
In this session we will discuss:
Availability zone failure protection in two, or three availability zone setups.
Backup and restore for your cluster data, mitigating data corruption, or reverting unwanted changes
Disaster recovery: protecting you from a complete data center failure.
We will go over recommendations and best practices learned from running OpenShift clusters in the public cloud and on-premise.

Speakers

Thursday February 18, 2021 4:30pm - 4:55pm CET
Session Room 4

4:30pm CET

Container Plumbing
Each year we have a meetup to discuss all things around container Plumbing. Discussion of futures and what has happened over the last year around
Podman, Buildah, Flatpack, CoreOS, CRI-O, and all of the related tools

Speakers
avatar for Daniel Walsh

Daniel Walsh

Senior Distinguished Engineer, Red Hat, Inc.
Daniel Walsh has worked in the computer security field for over 30 years. Dan is a Consulting Engineer at Red Hat. He joined Red Hat in August 2001. Dan leads the Red Hat Container Engineering team since August 2013, but has been working on container tec


Thursday February 18, 2021 4:30pm - 5:30pm CET
x Meetup Room

4:45pm CET

Building Architecture Diagrams the Red Hat way
How do you communicate complex, multi-product/project architectures clearly with your peers and customers? Which tool should you use? Is there a Red Hat recommended way? Good news! The Red Hat invested in some brand approved templates for the popular, and open source, tool called Draw.io. In this session you'll learn how to create multi-level architectures that include networking and data-flow elements. Come learn to use the same architecture language that others in Red Hat have come to love.

The workshop will include draw.io. This is javascript based and therefore doesn't need any special setup.

Speakers

Thursday February 18, 2021 4:45pm - 5:25pm CET
x Workshop Room

5:00pm CET

Azure CLI 101
Azure CLI is opensource command line tool to manage Microsoft Azure. In this session we will focus on creating and managing Linux VMs in Microsoft Azure.

You will learn:
How to install install Azure CLI
How to use CloudShell
Key concepts of Azure CLI tool
How to create and manage Linux VMs

Speakers
avatar for Stepan Bechynsky

Stepan Bechynsky

Azure Technical Trainer, Microsoft
Stepan started as freelance developer and trainer 1995. In 2006 Stepan joined Microsoft as Technical Evangelist at Czech Republic. After nine years he left Microsoft to start working as European Cloud Team Lead at pharmaceutical company MSD. He spent in pharma industry one and half... Read More →


Thursday February 18, 2021 5:00pm - 5:25pm CET
Session Room 5

5:00pm CET

2019: When Open Source met The Suits
We often hear about big tech legal battles like Google vs Oracle, Samsung vs Apple etc. Not everyday do we get to hear about such big legal problems related to a FOSS project. In this talk, I am going to talk about a very interesting case between a major Open Source project and a NPE(Non-practicing Entity) that took place at the courts of California in 2019.

Speakers
avatar for Gaurav Agrawal

Gaurav Agrawal

SOFTWARE ENGINEER, SKUAD.IO


Thursday February 18, 2021 5:00pm - 5:25pm CET
Session Room 3

5:00pm CET

Fedora Zuul CI - an update
Last year, at devconf'20, we introduced a CI/CD workflow for Fedora packages around the Pull Request, based on Zuul. After more than one year, the workflow still provides CI for Fedora distgits, but also for some core projects of the Fedora community. During this session we will give an update on the current status of the platform, describe improvements we have made to it, present some usage statistics and finally offer guidance on how to onboard your project.

Speakers
avatar for Fabien Boucher

Fabien Boucher

Senior Engineer, Red Hat
My team within Red Hat focuses on developing and improving Opendev's CI/CD toolbox. We aim to provide access to this toolbox to other dev teams via a CentOS based Linux distribution dedicated to software development called Software Factory ( https://softwarefactory-project.io ). I... Read More →
MH

Matthieu Huin

Senior Software Engineer, Red Hat
My team within Red Hat focuses on developing and improving Opendev's CI/CD toolbox. We aim to provide access to this toolbox to other dev teams via a CentOS based Linux distribution dedicated to software development called Software Factory ( https://softwarefactory-project.io ). I... Read More →


Thursday February 18, 2021 5:00pm - 5:25pm CET
Session Room 6

5:00pm CET

My unpopular ReactJS opinions
I would like to share with you some of my unpopular opinions about React. I am going to say many unconventional thoughts about:
- Redux vs Context API
- HOC
- Reducers
- State machines
- Handle forms

Speakers

Thursday February 18, 2021 5:00pm - 5:25pm CET
Session Room 1

5:00pm CET

Journey Of Devops Teams in a Corporate Environment
During the last five years, the speakers gained experience in an enterprise environment on their DevOps missions. In two separate teams, they came across two similar problems.

At a first glance, the new freedom of tools, languages and frameworks felt liberating. But it quickly let to efficiency traps and unevenly distributed knowledge inside the team.

Secondly, most of the corporate templates for architecture documentation just did not suite their context and toolset. So instead of using long word documents, they started to experiment with a docs as code approach.

You will learn from first-hand experience how to prevent these problems, no matter if you are just starting out with DevOps, or if you are already getting your hands dirty. We will share some tool tips with you to increase your speed and comfort on the track with DevOps.

Speakers

Thursday February 18, 2021 5:00pm - 5:40pm CET
Session Room 4

5:00pm CET

Responsible AI: Ethics in Software Development
Responsible AI: Building ethical practices in your software development lifecycle
Advancements in AI are different than other technologies because of the pace of innovation, and its proximity to human intelligence - impacting us at a personal and societal level. The industry today is optimistic about the incredible potential for AI and other advanced technologies to empower people, widely benefiting current and future generations, thereby working for the common good.

However, nearly 9 out of 10 organizations across countries have encountered ethical issues resulting from the use of AI. As Microsoft, we recognize that these same technologies also raise important challenges that we need to address clearly, thoughtfully, and affirmatively. In this talk, I will present Microsoft's approach towards Responsible AI, talking about the six principles to develop technology responsibly.
This will be a focussed session where I will start with a demo of how, if not used properly, AI can lead to biases. Post that we will go into Microsoft's principles and how they lead to an efficient system - showcasing how the same demo will look after incorporating the Responsible AI Principles.

Speakers

Thursday February 18, 2021 5:00pm - 5:40pm CET
Session Room 2

5:30pm CET

Making a Wordpress developer stack on OpenShift 4
In this session I will walk you through my experience of preparing migration of Wordpress website from the local server to the OpenShift 4.
I will also talk about preparing developer stack which will include Red Hat CodeReady Cloud IDE, PHP-FPM and Tekton CICD implementation.
At the end of presentation I will share link to all materials including "Wordpress on Openshift" template.

Speakers
avatar for Tereza Gabrielova

Tereza Gabrielova

Site Reliability Engineer, Red Hat
I am experienced as both developer and system administrator who is very passionate about ever changing world of cloud and container products. I like to give my best when supporting our customers of OpenShift Dedicated or developing product features. To maintain a required work-life... Read More →


Thursday February 18, 2021 5:30pm - 5:55pm CET
Session Room 5

5:30pm CET

Btrfs: The Butter of Fedora
Starting with Fedora 33, all desktop variants of Fedora use Btrfs as the default filesystem. This talk will introduce Btrfs to the community and talk about why it's important for the future of Fedora and Linux in general. This includes a small overview of the filesystem, how to get started with taking advantage of Btrfs features, and some discussion of the future plans around Btrfs in Fedora.

Speakers
avatar for Neal Gompa

Neal Gompa

DevOps Engineer II, Datto, Inc.
DevOps Engineer by day, Linux systems aficionado and developer by night! Neal is a developer and contributor in Fedora, Mageia, and openSUSE, focusing primarily on the base Linux system components, such as package and software management. He's a big believer in "upstream first", which... Read More →


Thursday February 18, 2021 5:30pm - 5:55pm CET
Session Room 6

5:30pm CET

Life After Selenium
Selenium has been the unchallenged leader in open source UI testing since 2004. The web has changed since then and our tools should, too.

In this talk, we'll go over the problems with Selenium and how the new tools solve them. We'll (cross our fingers and) do some live demos with webdriver.io, puppeteer, playwright and cypress. We'll end with Selenium 4.0 and what it might mean for your current project.

Speakers
avatar for John Hill

John Hill

Senior Automation Engineer, Red Hat


Thursday February 18, 2021 5:30pm - 5:55pm CET
Session Room 1

5:30pm CET

The pet projects of Dr Frank Einstein...
Many developers have pet projects. It can be that little tool that you use daily. Or it can be something a bit larger, something that you secretly (or not so secretly) hope will become big at some point in a vague future. In this session, I will not talk about your pet projects, however. I will talk about mine. This means that I will mostly talk about *failed* pet projects, some seemingly insane efforts that never went anywhere, but that I keep hammering on relentlessly. You think you have problems with your pet projects? Wait until you see mine ;-) For sanity, I will of course contrast that with more successful open-source pet projects.

Now, why would failures be interesting? Survivor bias. By looking only at successful projects, we fail to learn about all the things that can cause a project to fail, stall, choke or wither. On the other hand, failure is still the best teacher. The more you fail, the more you have learned. I also want developers, notably younger ones, to own the phrase "When you fail, redefine success". I want to highlight, through my own experience, how failure is always relative. I want to explain why I am proud of my failures as much as of my successes. I want to encourage every one of you to dream big and fail big. I want you to dream that you are Einstein, even if in the end, it turns out that like me you are closer to Frank than Albert.

I will illustrate this talk with the four following pet projects of mine: XL, Tao3D, make-it-quick and the flight recorder library. And I will complement that analysis of failures by contrasting with three pet projects I consider successes: git publish, bichon and qboot. By exploring these various projects, how they grew a community (or not), their code size, their purpose, how easy it is to maintain and develop them. and more, I hope to give you some interesting data points for your own future pet project.

My conclusion here: It is OK to fall in love with your monster, as long as you do it intentionally.

Speakers
avatar for Christophe de Dinechin

Christophe de Dinechin

SPICE developer at Red Hat, founder of the Tao3D project, Red Hat
Christophe works on SPICE and 3D virtualization at Red Hat. He's passionate about 3D, virtualization and programming languages. His GitHub page is http://github.com/c3d.


Thursday February 18, 2021 5:30pm - 6:10pm CET
Session Room 3

5:30pm CET

OKD Working Group: State of OKD4/FCOS
OKD is the Community Distribution of Kubernetes that powers Red Hat OpenShift. Built around a core of OCI container packaging and Kubernetes container cluster management and leverages Fedora CoreOS. The community is invited to join this birds-of-a-feather (BoF) session to discuss the latest release of OKD 4, its road map, and learn how to use the new CodeReady Container for OKD4 to get started locally. Members of the OKD4 Working Group and Fedora CoreOS community will be in attendance and able to answer questions on how to deploy and configure OKD4 on everything from BareMetal, Single Clusters to Amazon, Vsphere, Azure and more. Learn more at https://okd.io.

Co-Chairs:

Diane Mueller, Director Community Development, OKD-Working Group Co-Chair
Christian Glombek, Software Engineer, OKD-Working Group Co-Chair
Vadim Rutkovsky, Software Engineer, OKD-Working Group Co-Chair

Speakers
avatar for Diane Mueller

Diane Mueller

Director, Community Development, Red Hat
Director, Community Development, Red Hat (https://redhat.com) ; Co-Chair, OKD Working Group, the Community Distribution of Kubernetes that powers Red Hat OpenShift (https://okd.io) and founder/organizer of OpenShift Commons (https://commons.openshift.org)


Thursday February 18, 2021 5:30pm - 6:30pm CET
x Meetup Room

5:45pm CET

OpenShift multi-cluster management with RH ACM
OpenShift adoption keeps growing every day and with that new challenges arise.

One of those challenges is managing your multiple OpenShift clusters across your different infrastructures, whether they are on-prem or cloud-based.

In this session, we will have an overview on Red Hat Advanced Cluster Management for Kubernetes where we will discover how it can help us to manage our Kubernetes clusters across the globe.

We will go through the 4 main pillars of RH ACM:

- Cluster Lifecycle: We will see how we can deploy/update/manage OpenShift clusters with RH ACM.
- Observability: We will see how we can consume metrics/data from multiple clusters from a single point.
- Application Lifecycle: We will see how we can deploy and manage applications across our cluster fleet.
- Policy and Governance: We will see how we can define policies and configurations so our clusters are compliant with the security best practices at our company.

The audience can expect to get:

- Some of the challenges you will face when dealing with multiple clusters management.
- Basic understanding of multi-cluster observability and how it can help to diagnose issues / understand the current state of your infrastructures.
- Basic notions of GitOps and how we can use GitOps to deploy applications to our cluster fleet.
- Basic notions around policies and how you can use them to be compliant with the security standards at your company.

Speakers
avatar for Andres Valero

Andres Valero

Specialist Solution Architect, Red Hat


Thursday February 18, 2021 5:45pm - 6:25pm CET
Session Room 4

5:45pm CET

Data Science Meets DevOps: Gitops with OpenShift
OpenShift being a fast-growing open source application platform, makes deploying and managing machine learning models very easy and convenient. Since the development of machine learning models is an iterative procedure, many data scientists prefer to store their model source code like their Jupyter notebooks in Git so that they can perform frequent updates to their models. These models are then deployed via OpenShift in a production environment. To obtain the most optimized model, it is necessary for the models to be continuously retrained and deployed. How can we efficiently manage this periodic retraining and deployment of these machine learning models?

In this talk you will learn how to leverage DevOps for managing machine learning models on OpenShift. With the help of CI/CD tools like Tekton pipelines, we can now extend version control for data science applications as well. You will walk away from this talk knowing how to:
1. Train a machine learning model on an example use case
2. Maintain ML model code in Git
3. Setup CI/CD pipeline for your ML application

Speakers
avatar for Hema Veeradhi

Hema Veeradhi

Software Engineer, Red Hat
Software Engineer working with the AI Center of Excellence team, part of the office of the CTO. Exploring and integrating open source AI operations across Red Hat platforms.


Thursday February 18, 2021 5:45pm - 6:25pm CET
Session Room 2

5:45pm CET

Host your own on-premise Ansible Galaxy
This workshop will demo and help you setup an on-premise software for storing, syncing, and distributing Ansible Collection and Role content. This is analogous to an on-premise version of galaxy.ansible.com. To get up and running quickly, we’ll be using a pre-built container with pulp_ansible (https://pulp-ansible.readthedocs.io/) and (https://github.com/ansible/galaxy_ng/).

We will demonstrate:
Creating one or more repositories to store Collections and Roles
Installing Role and Collection content using the `ansible-galaxy` CLI client from these repositories
Synchronizing Collections and Roles from galaxy.ansible.com
Uploading Collection content via `ansible-galaxy` CLI
Copying Collections and Roles between multiple repositories, simulating dev -> staging -> production environments
Perform these operations using a great UI, whenever possible, and APIs otherwise

To participate, all that is needed is the ability to run one container.

Speakers

Thursday February 18, 2021 5:45pm - 6:25pm CET
x Workshop Room

6:00pm CET

How to build an operator that doesn't break prod
Audience
This talk is targeted at software developers and SREs interested in development practices for Kubernetes operators. Are they interested in how development of an operator is different from other software projects? This project will give an outline of the operator pattern and how development looks like, focusing on the importance of good engineering practices. Are they writing a Kubernetes operator just to automate a simple task? They should write tests for it, and this talk will tell them why. As Site Reliability Engineers in OpenShift Dedicated, we're developing and maintaining a number of operators to keep toil on all our operated clusters as low as possible.

Outline
In a recently published blog post I wrote about how to make sure a Kubernetes operator project is maintainable and follows software development best practices. As SREs we create and maintain a growing number of Operators to keep toil away from us. But a poorly designed, implemented or tested operator can just create toil on its own by not functioning correctly. Adding new features to it can get hard for SREs as bugs can go in undiscovered and the confidence in adding new code can be low if the operator lacks an adequate test suite.

In this talk I will talk about the important concepts you should keep in mind when developing your own Kubernetes operator. Even if you want to start a new project just to automate the setup and configuration of a small application, make sure to give all the attention to good software development practices it needs, even if you feel this could slow down the development and even take you more time than just performing that task by hand. Software grows, and in the long run it will pay out if you craft a tested and readable operator from the beginning.

Key Takeaways
During this talk, attendees should have learned the importance of (1) treating a Kubernetes operator as production code. (2) It is very helpful to wrap external dependencies, where (3) tests will help achieve this goal as well as help improve the overall structure of the code.

Speakers
avatar for Manuel Dewald

Manuel Dewald

Software Engineer / Site Reliability Engineering, Red Hat


Thursday February 18, 2021 6:00pm - 6:25pm CET
Session Room 5

6:00pm CET

Packager Dashboard - Life of packager made easy
Fedora Packager Dashboard is a web application aiming to make the life of Fedora packagers easier. It combines data from multiple sources (bugzilla, bodhi, koschei,...) relevant to the maintainers of Fedora packages.

Tracking all these sites can be time consuming, especially if you maintain dozens of different packages, so the Dashboard provides everything you need (or at least what we've thought of) - condensed, cached, searchable and filterable on one page.

How did the idea evolve into a complete solution saving time of Red Hatters and community packagers? What issues we had to overcome? What are the future plans?

Speakers
avatar for Frantisek Zatloukal

Frantisek Zatloukal

Quality Engineer, Red Hat


Thursday February 18, 2021 6:00pm - 6:25pm CET
Session Room 6

6:00pm CET

User Experience (UX) + Free Software = ❤
We want free software to matter, to reach its highest potential to change the world for the better. In many fields, however, there is a massive gap between the existence of these tools and their actual usage on the front lines. How do we bridge that gap, so free software has a chance to make a difference? We need better UX to bridge that gap. This talk outlines a case study of a free software platform - the ChRIS project - aiming to bridge that gap between the wealth of free sofware medical analytical tools and frontline clinical practice with a user experience that meets the needs of medical researchers and clinicians. We believe ChRIS will help deliver the UX clinicians need to give them access to amazing free software tools that can improve medicine.

Speakers
avatar for Mo Duffy

Mo Duffy

Senior Principal Interaction Designer, Red Hat
Máirín is a senior principal interaction designer at Red Hat. A recipient of the O’Reilly Open Source Award, Máirín has over 15 years of expertise in user experience and design working in upstream Free/Libre and Open Source Software (FLOSS) communities. Her portfolio includes... Read More →


Thursday February 18, 2021 6:00pm - 6:25pm CET
Session Room 1
 
Friday, February 19
 

9:00am CET

Taking matters into my own hands: How an engineer increased her impact and satisfaction at work
At the end of the session, you will know the one thing you have to act on when you are back in your organization to increase your impact and satisfaction.

Pranay struggles with her coder job. Everything seems always to fall apart and ends up in tiring and stressful firefighting sessions.

Pranay tried different solutions, and nothing is really working until that one thing she discovered. A not so subtle change in the way she looks at the world will bring her ways to increase her impact and satisfaction at work.

The session is a real-world practical one that helps you increase your impact and satisfaction at work no matter who you work with.

In the session, we will follow Pranay, a fictional character who struggles in her current team. The people around her are clueless. Along the way, Pranay learns something from the people she interacts with that gets her thinking in a new way enabling her to take a different course of action.



Speakers
avatar for Alexis Monville

Alexis Monville

Engineering Leadership Team, Red Hat
Alexis est membre de l’équipe de leadership de l’engineering de l’entreprise open source Red Hat. Il apporte plus de 20 ans d’expérience de management dans divers secteurs, comme l’industrie automobile, les startups web, le conseil en technologies de l’information, le... Read More →


Friday February 19, 2021 9:00am - 9:40am CET
Main Stage

9:45am CET

Containerize your Java Applications using Eclipse JKube
In this presentation you'll get to know a little bit more about Eclipse JKube and how to get started to integrate it in your Java Project. JKube brings your Java applications closer to Kubernetes and OpenShift by providing the tools you need to easily deploy them into the cloud.

The presentation starts with a very brief introduction to the project and a description of its main features.

After this very brief introduction we'll get hands-on with the project and start a live demonstration. A random popular GitHub hosted Java project will be cloned and quickly configured to use Eclipse JKube. Following the initial project setup, the application will be deployed both to an OpenShift and a Kubernetes cluster. Additional JKube features such as in-cluster debugging or log inspection will also be showcased using this project.

Recently developed features and next steps will also be shared at the end of the presentation.

Speakers
avatar for Marc Nuri

Marc Nuri

Senior Software Engineer, Red Hat
Marc is an open-source enthusiast and software developer. Currently Marc is working as a senior software engineer at Red Hat in the Developer Tools team focusing on Java. He is leading the development efforts of Eclipse JKube and is part of the core maintainer team for Fabric8 Kubernetes... Read More →


Friday February 19, 2021 9:45am - 10:10am CET
Session Room 4

9:45am CET

Dynamic Environments - A tale from the trenches
Back in 2017, Runtastic chose OpenShift as a container platform. At that time, we had around 40 microservices that needed to be containerized.The biggest requirement for the adoption was that engineers should be able to spawn one entire development environment with all the microservices and dependencies whenever they want.In this talk, I'll tell you about the Runtastic approach to fulfill these requirements such as Slackbots, Template Management, Configuration Injection, Containerization, and how we glued everything together.

Speakers

Friday February 19, 2021 9:45am - 10:25am CET
Session Room 1

9:45am CET

Container Live Migration
One of the main reasons Checkpoint/Restore in User-Space (CRIU) exists is to enabled container live migration and although container live migration is always viewed as an outlier or corner case of containers, because containers are supposed to be stateless, CRIU continues to get better at container live migration. Maybe containers are supposed to be stateless, but CRIU still sees growing interest in its container migration features and especially the integration in container runtimes. In this talk I want to present details about CRIU and with which clever tricks it provides the ability to checkpoint and restore processes and whole containers. I also want to show how it is integrated in container runtimes like runc, crun, lxc/lxd, borg and Podman. I want to close the talk with a few demos showcasing CRIU's features in Podman as presented before to live migrate containers and how to use checkpoints to decrease the container startup time. The goal of this talk is to give a technical presentation how containers can be live migrated, that it is easily possible to live migrate containers and that the container migration technology has additional use cases.

Speakers
avatar for Adrian Reber

Adrian Reber

Principal Software Engineer, Red Hat
Adrian is a Principal Software Engineer at Red Hat and is migrating processes at least since 2010. He started to migrate processes in a high performance computing environment and at some point he migrated so many processes that he got a PhD for that. Most of the time he is now migrating... Read More →


Friday February 19, 2021 9:45am - 10:25am CET
Session Room 3

9:45am CET

Kata Containers will impact you. Yes, you!
Kata Containers runs your existing containers in their own virtual machine. It lets you combine the ecosystem of containers with the features of virtual machines. In this sessions we will see why this strange project ultimately impacts so many developers, from the kernel all the way up to OpenShift.

Last year, we presented the work done to bring Kata Containers to Fedora. We were so young and naive back then! It turns out that this was only the very first step in an ongoing journey. In this introductory session, we will present the work done in 2020, outline a roadmap, tell you how this roadmap touches so many pieces, and give you a broad overview of other kata-related talks submitted by our team.

During 2020, we focused on integrating Kata Containers in the broader ecosystem, from operating system to orchestration. At the lower levels, we reinforced the integration of Kata Containers with features such as SELinux, cgroupsv2 or podman; we added support for high-performance networking using SR-IOV; we improved virtiofs, a better conduit to expose host storage to VMs and their containers. At the higher-end of the stack, we worked on bringing Kata Containers to OpenShift, and published a pre-release kata-operator for OpenShift 4.6. Finally, at the core, Kata Containers went through a major code reorganization and redesign, culminating in the release of Kata Containers 2.0, as well as numerous improvements in processes, issue triaging or continuous integration.

The purpose of this effort is to provide an alternative container runtime that you can, in most cases, transparently substitute to your traditional runc. But why would you want to do that? By exploring the overall architecture of Kata Containers, we will see how it differs from more traditional container runtimes, but also how and why version 2.0 was such a major overhaul. We will discuss some of the problems Kata Containers solves, like being able to run pods with different kernel configuration at low cost, using high-performance hardware-assisted I/O isolation with SR-IOV and DPDK, and in a not-to-distant future, be able to run containers in memory-encrypted virtual machines or migrate long-running containers between hosts. Some of these topics will be covered in more details in other talks.

We are not done, and we need a roadmap. The problem is that the Kata Containers roadmap cannot be thought of in isolation. Kata Containers interacts with many components, from virtual machine monitors to host and guest operating system to large-scale orchestration. In every case, the demands of Kata Containers push the boundaries, needing just a tiny little more than what exists today.

For example, at the kernel level, we are still putting the finishing touches on virtiofs, with things like DAX support. It is likely that we will also soon push some limits in the networking or namespace areas. In order to start containers faster and using less resources, we keep asking questions that lead others to invent interesting ways to start a kernel, like libkrun (nee libkip) or microvms. Even things like hotplugging or device discovery may need to be rethought, because as far as Kata Containers is concerned, they are so darn complicated and so darn slow!

In the hypervisor space, the Kata Containers effect was already felt, accelerating the push to make a leaner and meaner qemu, which now outperforms more specialized hypervisors; nemu is dead, it's now called qemu again. But we keep asking for more! We want an even smaller, more modular qemu. We already hinted at some of these efforts last year with qemu-mini. The particular needs of Kata Containers and other projects such as KubeVirt force libvirt and qemu to rethink how the pieces of the puzzle all fit together, from security to command-line processing. This is likely to ultimately result in a more modular design, where components may sometimes run as individual processes or as libraries.

In the OpenShift and Kubernetes space, Kata Containers pushes the envelope with respect to software packaging and delivery. We need robust and scalable solutions to install system software on various worker nodes, and this is not necessarily so easy to do on read-only operating systems. So here too, we need to invent new solutions.

Xu Wangs comes from Ant Group, one of the creators of the project, and they have a large deployment of Kata Containers in our production clusters. In this topic, the speaker will introduce the practice of Kata Containers in Ant Group and the community contributions in Kata 2.0 based on the experiences in Ant Group. In short, a virtualized container runtime could help the cluster with the strong isolation -- not only about security but also performance isolation and failure isolation

In the end, the roadmap of Kata Containers looks like a giant jigsaw puzzle where most pieces are in flight and keep changing shape.

Speakers
avatar for Christophe de Dinechin

Christophe de Dinechin

SPICE developer at Red Hat, founder of the Tao3D project, Red Hat
Christophe works on SPICE and 3D virtualization at Red Hat. He's passionate about 3D, virtualization and programming languages. His GitHub page is http://github.com/c3d.
avatar for Xu Wang

Xu Wang

Senior Staff Engineer, Ant Financial
Xu Wang is a senior staff engineer at Ant Financial and an initial member of Kata Containers Architecture Committee. He was the CTO and Cofounder of hyper.sh and created hypervisor-based open source container runtime runV (secure as VM, fast as container). runV merged with clear containers... Read More →
avatar for Ariel Adam

Ariel Adam

Software engineering manager, Red Hat
Part of the virtio-networking team at Red Hat working on advanced networking technologies.


Friday February 19, 2021 9:45am - 10:25am CET
Session Room 5

9:45am CET

Using strace to troubleshoot issues
In this session, you will learn the basics about strace and how we use it inside Red Hat's support organization to troubleshoot userland issues.
After going through the basic usage and minimum technical details, we will show you use cases where strace can help and where strace won't help.
Finally we will go through 6 examples, illustrating various use cases, such as troubleshooting systemd service startup or a slow ssh connection.

Speakers
avatar for Renaud METRICH

Renaud METRICH

Principal Software Maintenance Engineer, Red Hat
I joined Red Hat in 2017 to work as a software maintenance engineer specialized in Shells, Services and OS Installation. My daily job consists in analyzing post-mortem data of broken customer systems, reproduce issues, file (a lot of) bugs and provide fixes when I have time for that... Read More →



Friday February 19, 2021 9:45am - 10:25am CET
Session Room 6

9:45am CET

How can a network be "virtual"?
With the boom of clouds, there's a lot of talk about "virtual networks". Maybe you were wondering how a network could be virtualized. What does it mean, exactly?

We'll explain the motivation and needs that led to making networks virtual. We'll look into various technologies allowing implementation of virtual networks in Linux: VLANs, VXLAN and other tunnels, network name spaces and means of communicating between them, Open vSwitch, OVN, eBPF and more.

This is an introduction level talk and does not require prior specific knowledge. We'll make sure to leave enough room for questions.

Speakers
avatar for Jiri Benc

Jiri Benc

Principal Kernel Engineer, Red Hat
Jiri is a Linux kernel developer with networking background. His main focus nowadays is on network virtualization and networking solutions for cloud computing.


Friday February 19, 2021 9:45am - 10:25am CET
Session Room 7

9:45am CET

Container security automation with Ansible
Docker containers are the new way developers package applications. Due to the ease of use and deployment, more and more applications are getting deployed in containers for production use. With so many moving parts, it becomes imperative that we have the capability to continuously scan Docker containers for security issues. We will explore following points in our discussion:
- Understanding continuous security concepts
- Automating vulnerability assessments of Docker containers using Ansible
- Scheduled scans using Ansible Tower for Docker security
- Scheduled scans using Ansible Tower for operating systems and kernel security
- Scheduled scans for file integrity checks, host level monitoring using Ansible for various compliance initiatives

Speakers

Friday February 19, 2021 9:45am - 10:25am CET
Session Room 2

9:45am CET

Top things we need to learn about UX
Join us to improve product and content usability for GUI and CLI. Learn how to recognize product usability issues before they result in a poor customer content experience.
Jakob Nielsen’s heuristics are the most used usability heuristics for user interface design. Let's explore how to apply the heuristics and improve customer experience of your product.


Friday February 19, 2021 9:45am - 10:25am CET
x Workshop Room

10:30am CET

Do less work and deliver more
Do you know how many work items are there in your team's backlog right now? How many items your team is working at the same time? How many items are YOU working at the same time? If you limit your work in progress you can deliver more. Yes, that's right. These limits are not there to limit your progress, in fact it is quite the opposite. I this talk I want to share with people that understanding, visualizing, managing your workflow and having Work-in-progress limits can help you deliver more.

Speakers
avatar for Fernando Colleone

Fernando Colleone

Principal Agile Practitioner, Red Hat
I help teams to reflect, adjust and improve their work.


Friday February 19, 2021 10:30am - 10:55am CET
Session Room 1

10:30am CET

Operator, please connect me with Kata containers!
The Kata container operator was developed to make it easy to install and manage (install and keep it running) the Kata container runtime in an OpenShift cluster. While I will focus on OpenShift in this talk the operator is also capable to work on a vanilla Kubernetes cluster. I will explain and demonstrate how to use the operator to install Kata on a cluster and give an overview on currently available features and what is planned for the future.

https://www.github.com/openshift/kata-operator/

Speakers
JF

Jens Freimann

Red Hat
I'm working for Red Hat as a software engineer, mostly on virtio in QEMU, kernel and DPDK.


Friday February 19, 2021 10:30am - 10:55am CET
Session Room 5

10:30am CET

ebpf iterators
This presentation shows alternative way of dumping kernel internal
data like processes, files, maps and possible many others with really
simple interface - reading a file.
It will also describe design, implementation and usage of base iterators
together with planned usage of iterators in perf tool to speed up task
collection on big servers.

Speakers
avatar for Jiri Olsa

Jiri Olsa

Software Engineer, Red Hat
Jiri works for RedHat full time on Linux as kernel generalist engineer in Brno office, Czech Republicech Republic. He currently divides his work time between upstream perf work and maintaining RHEL perf.


Friday February 19, 2021 10:30am - 10:55am CET
Session Room 6

10:30am CET

Deploy covid-19 app using devfile on OpenShift 4.x
OpenShift Connector for VS Code brings the power and convenience of Kubernetes and Red Hat OpenShift to developers. With the extension, users can create a new Kubernetes or OpenShift application, deploy it to a local or remote cluster in seconds and simplify the developer experience.
The VSCode extension allows you to create, connect, deploy, debug components without leaving your IDE and breaking your development flow. Easily deploy the code directly to Kubernetes or OpenShift using devfile deployment method.

Through the demo presented, you'll see how to deploy a Covid-19 Tracker React Application on OpenShift 4.x. The example uses the following scenarios for the end-to-end scenario:
- Create a local instance of OpenShift using Red Hat CodeReady Containers within VSCode
- Devfile Integration : Deploy the Covid-19 tracker application using NodeJS devfile component
- Deploy Operator-backed services : Operators provide custom resource definitions (CRDs), which you can use to create service instances and link to components
- Integrated Debugging and Log Viewing/Streaming of the component
- Explore all the Kubernetes resources such as Build Configs, pods from IDE

This lets you write, build, and deploy applications entirely on Kubernetes or OpenShift and bringing iterative development and deployment flows directly to developers.

Github: https://github.com/redhat-developer/vscode-openshift-tools
VSCode Marketplace: https://marketplace.visualstudio.com/items?itemName=redhat.vscode-openshift-connector

Speakers
MS

Mohit Suman

Senior Software Engineer, Red Hat
Mohit Suman is based out of beautiful country India. He works as a Senior Software Engineer and Agile Coach at Red Hat R&D. Currently working for Developer Tools team and making tools to enhance the developer experience on hybrid-cloud infrastructure. An advocate of open source and... Read More →


Friday February 19, 2021 10:30am - 10:55am CET
Session Room 4

10:30am CET

Validate your TCPIP stack on the embedded device
Verification and validation of the TCP/IP stack is a very important subject for many reasons (conformance, security, performance, etc.), but how do we test the stack on embedded devices? Especially in the MCU world, where we typically have no operating system, just a bare-metal application/scheduler or an RTOS. This contribution will elaborate on these three basic techniques, compare and contrast them:
1) Compile the TCP/IP stack on the host machine and test the standard way
2) Test with an emulator
3) Test on the actual embedded device

Then will share some practical notes about:
* TCP protocol conformance testing using ttcn3 engine
* Fuzzer testng of the lwIP stack

Speakers

Friday February 19, 2021 10:30am - 10:55am CET
Session Room 2

10:30am CET

Layer 3 networking with BGP in hyperscale DCs
As data centres grow to hyper-scale, the limitations of traditional Layer 2 networking architectures are becoming apparent. Issues such as ToR TCAM explosions, large L2 broadcast domains and slow STP convergence can limit scalability and performance. One approach to resolve these issues, which has been successfully deployed in hyper-scale data centres, is the use of fully Layer 3 networks using Layer 3 routing protocols such as BGP or OSPF. BGP, in particular, has proved it's scalability as it is the main routing protocol on the internet and there is a growing trend to use it internally to route traffic in L3-routed data centres.

This paradigm shift in data centre design presents challenges in some of our products such as OSP and OCP which have been designed with the assumption that L2-switched networks are the predominant networking architecture in the data centre. In this presentation, we will discuss some of the key uses cases for which we expect Layer 3 routed networks will be beneficial. We will present some of the architectural and software components that will need to be deployed to enable BGP across our products and ongoing work in open source communities to enable them. Finally, we will present what the future may hold and some challenges that will be presented across our products in order to further enable these use cases (workloads that rely on L2 and hardware offload).


Friday February 19, 2021 10:30am - 10:55am CET
Session Room 7

10:30am CET

Sync modules of Ceph Rados Gateway
This talk will be about Ceph Rados Gateway's multi-site replication capabilities, mainly focusing on different cloud sync APIs that can help unlock use cases like syncing data to multiple cloud providers, indexing metadata in ElasticSearch, data archival and more.

The audience will learn the following:
1. How S3 objects are replicated in ceph.
2. Understand how a rich set of capabilities can be provided atop a single framework.

As a pre-requisite, it would help to know what ceph object gateway is. The link is provided below.
https://docs.ceph.com/en/latest/radosgw/


Friday February 19, 2021 10:30am - 10:55am CET
Session Room 3

10:45am CET

Up and running with Fedora CoreOS
In this workshop, you will learn to build your first Fedora CoreOS deployment best practices and how to build a basic pipeline for your container workloads. We will cover getting started with a basic deployment, building your first Ignition file, booting on a cloud (AWS), and booting on a local hypervisor. We will install, build a simplified pipeline for maintenance, and upgrade your installation. Once we have a pipeline for maintenance, you can explore how to make changes to the base by switching streams and starting services on first boot.

Speakers

Friday February 19, 2021 10:45am - 11:25am CET
x Workshop Room

11:00am CET

Break
Friday February 19, 2021 11:00am - 11:30am CET
Main Stage

11:30am CET

Kdump memory usage
Kdump is a fundamental component for debugging Linux kernel panics. And by design, it requires to pre-reserve a chunk of continues physical memory. It's been a long time issue to keep the balance between minimizing the memory usage and avoiding OOM during kdump.
In this session, the speaker will share some techniques and new tools that were used to analyze and minimize the memory usage in kdump, which will also be useful for other tighten environment like embedded systems. And also, the speaker will share about current ongoing works in this area.

Speakers
avatar for Kairui Song

Kairui Song

Senior Software Engineer, Red Hat


Friday February 19, 2021 11:30am - 11:55am CET
Session Room 6

11:30am CET

Large Virtual Address support in ARM64 kernel
With ARMv8.2 architecture extensions becoming available in new / upcoming ARM64 CPUs, two new hardware extensions, namely - LVA (Large Virtual Addressing)
and LPA (Large Physical Addressing) are also being supported in open-source software now.

Starting from Linux kernel version 5.4, the 52-bit (Large) Virtual Address (VA) and Physical Address (PA) support was introduced for the ARM64 kernel. Although the kernel documentation describes these features (see [1] for more details) and how they impact the new kernels running on older CPUs (which don't support 52-bit VA extension in hardware) and the newer CPUs (which support 52-bit VA extension in hardware), it is still at-times complex for a normal user to understand the same and understand how one can "opt-in" for receiving VAs from a 52-bit space.

In this talk, I explain how:
A. the kernel memory layout gets "flipped" for ARM64 after the support for these features were added,
B. user-space applications, especially the ones which provide debugging support (e.g. kexec-tools, makedumpfile and crash-utility) get impacted because of the same, and
C. how user-space applications can "opt-in" to receiving VAs from a 52-bit space by specifying an mmap hint parameter that is larger than 48-bit.
ARMv8.2 architecture extensions - LVA and LPA:
--------------------------------------------------------------

* ARMv8.2 architecture provides two important extensions - Large Virtual Addressing (LVA) and Large Physical Addressing (LPA).
* ARMv8.2-LVA supports a larger VA space for each translation table base register of up to 52 bits when using the 64KB translation granule.
* ARMv8.2-LPA:
- Allows a larger intermediate physical address (IPA) and PA space of up to 52 bits when using the 64KB translation granule.
- Allows a level 1 block size where the block covers a 4TB address range for the 64KB translation granule if the implementation support 52 bits of PA.

52-bit VA support in the kernel:
--------------------------------
Since the newer kernels with the LVA support should run well on older CPUs (which don't support LVA extension in hardware) and the newer CPUs (which support LVA extension in hardware), the design approach chosen is to have a single binary which supports 52-bit (which must also be able to fall back to 48-bit at early boot time if the hardware feature is not present).

This design approach requires the kernel to support the following variables for supporting the new virtual address space:
VA_BITSconstantthe *maximum* VA space size
vabits_actualvariablethe *actual* VA space size

So, while VA_BITS denotes the maximum VA space size, the actual VA space supported (depending on the switch made at boot-time) is indicated by vabits_actual.

Flipping the kernel memory layout:
----------------------------------
The design approach of keeping a single kernel binary necessitates the kernel .text to be in the higher addresses such that they are invariant to 48/52-bit VAs.

In order to optimise phys_to_virt() and virt_to_phys(), the PAGE_OFFSET is kept constant at 0xFFF0000000000000 (corresponding to 52-bit), this obviates the need for an extra variable read.

Impact on user-space applications which are used to debug kernel:
-----------------------------------------------------------------
A number of user-space applications are used to debug running / live kernels or to analyze the vmcore dump obtained from a crashing system - to determine
the root-cause of the kernel crash, for example: kexec-tools, makedumpfile and crash-utility.

When these are used to debug the ARM64 kernel, we see an impact on these as well because of the ARM64 kernel memory map getting "flipped". These applications also need to perform a translation table walk for determining a physical address corresponding to a virtual address (pretty much similar to how it is done in the kernel).
Accordingly, user-space applications need to be modified as they are broken upstream after the "flip" was introduced in the kernel memory map.

I have proposed fixes in the three affected user-space applications accordingly and while some of these have been accepted upstream, others are still pending (see [2], [3]).

52-bit userspace VAs:
---------------------
To maintain compatibility with user-space applications that relies on the ARMv8.0 VA space maximum size of 48-bits, the kernel will, by default,
return virtual addresses to userspace from a 48-bit range. User-space applications can "opt-in" to receiving VAs from a 52-bit space by specifying an mmap hint parameter that is larger than 48-bit:
maybe_high_address = mmap(~0UL, size, prot, flags,...);

[1]. https://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/torvalds/linux.git/tree/Documentation/arm64/memory.rst [Kernel documentation describing the memory map]
[2]. http://lists.infradead.org/pipermail/kexec/2020-September/021372.html [Proposed Makedumpfile upstream fix]
[3]. http://lists.infradead.org/pipermail/kexec/2020-September/021333.html [kexec fix]

Speakers
avatar for Bhupesh Sharma

Bhupesh Sharma

Senior Software Engg, Red Hat
I work with Red Hat and am I a part of the RH kernel team. I have been hacking on bootloaders and kernel used on arm architecture since past 13 years. I contribute to Linux, EFI/u-boot bootloader code base and also to user-space utilities like kexec-tools and crash-utility. Bringing... Read More →


Friday February 19, 2021 11:30am - 11:55am CET
Session Room 2

11:30am CET

How scrum teams can excel in a remote setting
This session will go over how to make your scrum process friendly for a remote setting. Scrum thrives in settings where everyone is co-located but in the digital world we can not assume that teams working in the same office is the standard. How can Scrum work for your team when its now remote? Its simple! Tailoring the processes to meet your teams needs will allow you to continue working without reinventing the entire wheel. In this talk we will go over what our new remote norm looks like, what scrum is, steps to consider when tailoring, and tips on how to tailor some of the process based off of real world experiences working with remote scrum teams.

Speakers

Friday February 19, 2021 11:30am - 12:10pm CET
Session Room 1

11:30am CET

Build Your Own Honeypot with ContainerSSH
We know of Podman, Docker, Kubernetes, and containers in general. Some of us have even come to enjoy immutable operating systems - not only on our servers, but also on our desktops. What if we want to extend this paradigm to when we log into SSH and want to immediately start in a container, our own little sandbox? We've built a tool for that. Let's talk about its origins in Java and how the project was re-written and launched in Go. There are various use cases we can think of:

* Offer SSH in a web hosting service
* Create your own honeypot
* Provide a Linux learning environment
* Build a high security environment

But that's not all. We're sure you can think of even more. As a demo, we'll show you live how you can use this open source tool to build your own honeypot and observe who tries to break your infrastructure where and how. You're invited to break into it during the presentation. This talk is aimed at people of all skill levels as we will start with the story of how ContainerSSH came to be and explain the main concepts along the way.

Speakers
avatar for Janos Pasztor

Janos Pasztor

Senior Software Engineer, Red Hat
Janos is a Senior Software Engineer at Red Hat and enjoys coding in his free time as well. Sometimes he comes up with ideas that occupy his evenings and weekends.



Friday February 19, 2021 11:30am - 12:10pm CET
Session Room 5

11:30am CET

PowerShell Core 101
PowerShell is a task automation and configuration management framework from Microsoft, consisting of a command-line shell and the associated scripting language. Initially a Windows component only, known as Windows PowerShell, it was made open-source and cross-platform on 18 August 2016 with the introduction of PowerShell Core. PowerShell Core concepts are different in many cases compare to classical Linux shells. This sessions is introduction to PowerShell Core. You will learn: How to install on your Linux distribution Basic concept of Object pipe Basics of PowerShell scripting language How to get help Security“ script signing

Speakers
avatar for Stepan Bechynsky

Stepan Bechynsky

Azure Technical Trainer, Microsoft
Stepan started as freelance developer and trainer 1995. In 2006 Stepan joined Microsoft as Technical Evangelist at Czech Republic. After nine years he left Microsoft to start working as European Cloud Team Lead at pharmaceutical company MSD. He spent in pharma industry one and half... Read More →


Friday February 19, 2021 11:30am - 12:10pm CET
Session Room 4

11:30am CET

Bringing vDPA to Life in Kubernetes
In this talk we will review vDPA (Virtio Datapath Acceleration) technology intended to provide wirespeed/wirelatency L2 network interfaces to pods building on the virtio open standard data plane. This allows the workloads to be decoupled from any driver dependencies on the underlying NIC, simplifying the certification of such workloads. Major vendors have added and are adding vDPA support to their NICs turning this technology into mainstream.

We will dive into the vDPA solution for Kubernetes based on adding a secondary network interface to pods using Multus and SR-IOV device plugin. We will review the different components of the vDPA end-to-end solution and discuss the main technical challenges we encountered. We will present a demo of vDPA accelerating pods in practice and conclude with future steps.

Speakers
MC

Maxime Coquelin

Software Engineer, Red Hat
AM

Adrián Moreno

Senior Software Engineer, Redhat


Friday February 19, 2021 11:30am - 12:10pm CET
Session Room 7

11:30am CET

Leapp: Red Hat tool to upgrade from RHEL7 to RHEL8
The Leapp upgrade tool enables to perform a live-upgrade of a RHEL7 system to RHEL8.
RHEL7 having entered Maintenance Support 2 Phase, Red Hat customers are invited to upgrade to RHEL8.2 asap.
This presentation goes through the various steps performed by Leapp to guarantee or do its best to avoid possible failures that would lead to breaking the system.
A demo of an upgrade will be performed as well.

Speakers
CB

Christophe Besson

Senior Software Maintenance Engineer, Red Hat
avatar for Renaud METRICH

Renaud METRICH

Principal Software Maintenance Engineer, Red Hat
I joined Red Hat in 2017 to work as a software maintenance engineer specialized in Shells, Services and OS Installation. My daily job consists in analyzing post-mortem data of broken customer systems, reproduce issues, file (a lot of) bugs and provide fixes when I have time for that... Read More →



Friday February 19, 2021 11:30am - 12:10pm CET
Session Room 3

11:45am CET

Easily enable tests in Fedora, RHEL, GitHub...
Imagine there would be a simple way to enable tests in the CI. Imagine the configuration would be consistent across Fedora, RHEL, CentOS, GitHub… so you would not have to always learn a new syntax for each. Imagine you could easily open source tests and share them across different distros. Imagine you could enter your component git repository, type just seven letters and all tests would be safely executed in your preferred environment. Imagine writing or debugging a test and reviewing test results would be a joyful task. Imagine… Or, do not imagine but come & try yourself:

* Learn how to use the new tmt command line tool
* Enable a simple test in the CI using a pull request
* Create a new test for your component, track coverage
* Safely and easily execute tests from your laptop
* Run and debug test code in your preferred environment
* Overview of Fedora CI support, Packit GitHub integration
* Real-life examples, hands-on experience, space for questions

Prerequisites:
Required: Laptop with Fedora, Fedora account, FPCA signed
Recommended: A package for experimenting / contributions
Optional: A test suitable for CI

Speakers
avatar for Petr Šplíchal

Petr Šplíchal

Principal Quality Engineer, Red Hat
Member of the Operating System CI team with focus on improving tools, processes and best practices.
avatar for Miroslav Vadkerti

Miroslav Vadkerti

Senior Prinicipal Quality Engineer, Red Hat
I work on Continuous Integration for RHEL. I am the co-author of https://github.com/gluetool/gluetool and Testing Farm.


Friday February 19, 2021 11:45am - 12:25pm CET
x Workshop Room

12:00pm CET

perf build IDs
This presentation shows new way for perf to handle sampled binaries.
It eases up report from different servers and deprecates the usage
of perf archive. With the help of debuginfod, sampled binaries can
be downloaded directly to reporting server.

The main idea is that build ids of sampled binaries are stored directly
in related map events, which speeds up and simplifies perf record.
I'll explain current and new ways of handling sampled binaries, that
should ease up life for customer support.

Speakers
avatar for Jiri Olsa

Jiri Olsa

Software Engineer, Red Hat
Jiri works for RedHat full time on Linux as kernel generalist engineer in Brno office, Czech Republicech Republic. He currently divides his work time between upstream perf work and maintaining RHEL perf.


Friday February 19, 2021 12:00pm - 12:25pm CET
Session Room 6

12:00pm CET

Cgroup Slab Memory Controller and Time Namespace
Control group (cgroup) and namespace are the two major features in the Linux kernel that make containers possible.

There are some exciting new cgroup and namespace features in the latest Linux kernel that can improve the container experience. This talk will focus on two major features that are being back-ported to the RHEL8 kernel, namely the new cgroup slab memory controller and time namespace. This talk will describe what these features are and some discussion on their underlying implementation as well as what improvement they will bring to the container experience.

Speakers
avatar for Waiman Long

Waiman Long

Principal Software Engineer, Red Hat
Principal Software EngineerWaiman Long is an experienced kernel software engineer at Red Hat, Inc. His major focus areas are kernel synchronization primitives, performance and scalability, and cgroup in the upstream Linux kernel as well as the Red Hat Enterprise Linux kernel.


Friday February 19, 2021 12:00pm - 12:25pm CET
Session Room 2

12:15pm CET

5 Agile practices every SRE team should adopt
As SRE (Site Reliability Engineering) teams contain a fair portion of software development work, and get filled up by software developers, it is a natural move to also adapt agile software development practices. The right agile model depends heavily on the percentage of development work vs. operations, which may be influenced by the team size. For example, in a small team where a high percentage of people is on call during the day, it might not make too much sense to plan sprints of 2 weeks if only a few backlog items are expected to get done in that timeframe.

Audience
This talk is targeted at everyone involved in Site Reliability Engineering, wondering how much agile to adopt - team leads, product owners, software developers, SREs. If you're planning to transform your ops team into an SRE team, your SRE team just got started, or already do SRE since quite some time. As a software engineer who recently joined SRE, I will talk about which practices I found useful to take over from software engineering, which ones are better dropped, and which ones I'm still missing sorely.

Agile Practices
Retrospective
While often being the first meeting to get dropped by teams as the relation to actual work items cannot be seen easily, the retrospective meeting is the tool for teams to iterate on how they work and improve, including which of the agile practices make sense to adopt it which don't.

Planning: Estimating Backlog Items
Planning meetings help the team understand priorities of items, the overall direction a project is heading and get a common understanding of how complex work is (with estimation). However, given a (not known) number of people is on call or doing incident response makes it hard to set sprint goals or commit to a consistent number of stories.

Standups
Standup meetings are useful, especially in distributed teams, to talk about what you're working on and where you need help. Frequency of the meeting does not necessarily be daily - and that hit me as software engineer unexpectedly hard.

Testing
If your SRE team is writing software, that software should be tested. No room for discussion.

That's what the software engineer might think - but you need to discuss. You need to convince your team testing is helpful. And that's as equally hard in an SRE team as in any software engineering team.

Pair programming
It's hard to convince people pair programming is helpful, and it isn't helpful in every situation - but confidence in code as well as operations changes (in an outage for example) is so much higher when working in a pair.

Key Takeaways
During this talk, attendees should have learned (1) that SRE and software engineering likewise benefit from agile development practices, of which at least (2) some practices are worth to adopt while others may not be too helpful for SRE. (3) Which ones are and are not helpful can be the easiest spotted by iterating not only work but also how we work (practice retrospectives).

Speakers
avatar for Manuel Dewald

Manuel Dewald

Software Engineer / Site Reliability Engineering, Red Hat


Friday February 19, 2021 12:15pm - 12:40pm CET
Session Room 1

12:15pm CET

Let There Be Topology-Awareness in Kube-Scheduler!
Performance-critical workloads require topology information in order to use co-located CPU cores and devices for industries like telco, HPC, and IoT. Despite the success of Kubernetes Topology Manager, the current native scheduler does not select a node based on its topology. It's time to solve this problem.

We will introduce the audience to hardware topology, the current state of Topology Manager, gaps in the current scheduling process, and prior out-of-tree solutions. We'll explain the workarounds available right now: custom schedulers, creating scheduling extensions, using node selectors, or manually assigning resources semi-automatically. All these methods have their drawbacks.

Finally, we will explain how we plan to improve the native scheduler to work with Topology Manager. Attendees will learn both current workarounds, and the future of topology aware scheduling in kubernetes.

K8s has taken the world by storm attracting unconventional workloads such as HPC Edge, IoT, Telco and Comm service providers, 5G, AI/ML and NFV solutions to it. This talk would benefit users, engineers, and cluster admins deploying performance sensitive workloads on k8s. Addition of newer nodes running alongside older ones in data centers results in hardware heterogeneity. Motivated by saving physical space in the data centers, newer nodes are packed with more CPUs, enhanced hardware capabilities. Exposing to use fine grain topology information for optimised workload placement would help service providers and VNF vendors too.
We'll explain numerous challenges encountered in efficiently deploying workloads due to inability to understand the hardware topology of the underlying bare metal infrastructure and scheduling based on it.
Scheduler's lack of knowledge of resource topology can lead to unpredictable application performance, in general under-performance, and in the worst case, complete mismatch of resource requests and kubelet policies, scheduling a pod where it is destined to fail, potentially entering a failure loop. Exposing cluster level topology to the scheduler empowers it to make intelligent NUMA aware placement decisions optimizing cluster wide performance of workloads. This would benefit Telco User Group in kubernetes, kubernetes and the overall CNCF ecosystem enabling improved application performance without impacting user experience.

Speakers

Friday February 19, 2021 12:15pm - 12:40pm CET
Session Room 5

12:15pm CET

Generating Kubernetes manifests using Dekorate
Dekorate offers a collection of Java annotations and processors aiming to generate during the compilation of your application the Kubernetes manifests. It will make your life even easier because you will not even need to edit the JSON and YAML files. You can use java annotations, an application.properties file or combine both for customizing the manifests. In this session I will show you how easy is to create the Kubernetes manifests to deploy your microservices in the container platform with Dekorate, don't miss it!

Speakers
avatar for Aurea Munoz Hernandez

Aurea Munoz Hernandez

I am a software developer since 2005 and I develop Java web applications. I live in Madrid and I'm working for Red Hat  with a focus on the integration of Spring Boot & Spring Cloud technology within the Red Hat Middleware portfolio. I contribute to existing or new Spring(Boot... Read More →


Friday February 19, 2021 12:15pm - 12:40pm CET
Session Room 4

12:15pm CET

Deploying containers without k8s ?
"While kubernetes is the clear winner for deploying and running services that needs to scale, is it the best solution for every use cases ?
In this presentation we will go over alternative to k8s. From cloud, or SaaS provider but also traditional Linux distributions. In particular we will look at the different container specific solution in the Linux ecosystem and what advantages they have to offer."

Speakers
avatar for Clement Verna

Clement Verna

Senior Software Engineer, Red Hat
Clément Verna is a Senior Software engineer working in the Community Platform Engineering team at Red Hat. His passions for working with others and finding better ways of working, naturally took him on the Agile and Continuous Improvement journey. He is using Continuous Improvement... Read More →


Friday February 19, 2021 12:15pm - 12:40pm CET
Session Room 3

12:15pm CET

Capturing network traffic in an eXpress Data Path
When XDP programs run on your Linux system, it can decide to modify the packet before passing it onto the kernel or sent it directly to another interface bypassing the kernel completely. How do you troubleshoot problems in this environment, as tcpdump might not help you? The answer is xdpdump, but how does it work, and what will it capture additionally to tcpdump?

Speakers
avatar for Eelco Chaudron

Eelco Chaudron

Senior Software Engineer, Red Hat
Senior Software Engineer


Friday February 19, 2021 12:15pm - 12:40pm CET
Session Room 7

12:30pm CET

Unifying Kernel Test Reporting with KernelCI
The landscape of Linux kernel testing and CI is notoriously fragmented. Systems like Intel's 0day, Linaro's LKFT, Google's Syzbot, Red Hat's CKI, and others, are each running their own tests, sending separate emails, and hosting different dashboards. As a result, developers have to cope with multiple diverse reports arriving at various stages of development cycle, and it's difficult to correlate and analyze results. The Linux Foundation's KernelCI project has been working on a CI stack and service for all to use, which is seeing increasing adoption. However, the project has also started a new effort aimed at already-established CI systems, letting participants keep their setups, but submit testing results to a common database and reporting system, using a simple, extensible protocol.

The system behind the new effort is called "KCIDB" (for "KernelCI Database") and is already receiving reports from the native KernelCI tests, RedHat's CKI and Google's Syzbot, with more systems working on joining. Our aim is to develop a unified report protocol and schema, maintain an open result database, provide a single dashboard, and to send email notifications aggregating the data from all the participating systems. We want to reduce developer load, and make it easier to discover and analyze kernel testing results.

Join this session to find out how far we've got, how our dashboard and email notifications look, how we're pulling this off, what the protocol and the schema is like, and how to start sending your reports or join the development.

Speakers
avatar for Nikolai Kondrashov

Nikolai Kondrashov

Senior Software Engineer, Red Hat
A self-taught software engineer. Love working on low-level software and dealing with hardware directly. Work on CKI project at Red Hat, maintain DIGImend project, and play with embedded as a hobby.


Friday February 19, 2021 12:30pm - 12:55pm CET
Session Room 2

12:30pm CET

What's new in USBGuard 1.0?
As technology advances, there are USB devices that may destroy your computer and even official enterprise USB devices infected with malware. With that in mind, have you ever felt uneasy about your system's security? That's the reason why USBGuard has been created, thus it can prevent any such attack. Furthermore it's being enhanced and maintained on a regular basis.
USBGuard is a software framework that protects your system against rogue USB devices (a.k.a. BadUSB) by implementing basic allowlisting and blocklisting capabilities. It's a great addition to anyone needing to protect a Linux system.

In this session you will be presented with a brief overview of USBGuard focusing on latest usability enhancements.


Friday February 19, 2021 12:30pm - 12:55pm CET
Session Room 6

12:30pm CET

Fedora CI Meetup
Meetup for Fedora CI SIG and everyone interested in CI and Test Automation in Fedora to discuss the current state and future plans

Speakers
avatar for Fabien Boucher

Fabien Boucher

Senior Engineer, Red Hat
My team within Red Hat focuses on developing and improving Opendev's CI/CD toolbox. We aim to provide access to this toolbox to other dev teams via a CentOS based Linux distribution dedicated to software development called Software Factory ( https://softwarefactory-project.io ). I... Read More →
avatar for Miroslav Vadkerti

Miroslav Vadkerti

Senior Prinicipal Quality Engineer, Red Hat
I work on Continuous Integration for RHEL. I am the co-author of https://github.com/gluetool/gluetool and Testing Farm.
AF

Aleksandra Fedorova

CI Engineer, Red Hat
Member of FESCo and Fedora CI SIG, interested in CI/CD, Fedora & RHEL CI and GatingFedora FAS: bookwar


Friday February 19, 2021 12:30pm - 1:30pm CET
x Meetup Room

12:45pm CET

How Lean is your Scrum?
Scrum has an often unjustified reputation among developers for being a heavyweight framework, with ceremonies designed to ultimately guide a product which can incur a lot of meeting time and commitment to maintenance of tickets, backlogs and requirements documents. Lean looks primarily at waste elimination and in a world that has found itself forced into a work from home culture, Scrum teams are now generating a lot of waste as they adapt their processes to be remote friendly. This is on top of any bad habits that formed around their flavor of Agile. With teams finding themselves experiencing meeting fatigue and drowning in process, the question needs to be asked, how Lean is your Scrum? Join me in this session where we look at the application of some Lean principles to Scrum and showcase the improvements at both a process and team happiness level that resulted from applying them in our remote Agile team.

Red Hat has a long history of remote working, with over half of the workforce long term remote. With covid-19, the vast majority of the company, along with the wider world, have found themselves working from home. Our team, which serves the Open Source communities for Fedora and CentOS, are almost exclusively remote, following our own flavor of Agile which is primarily focused on Scrum, but taking in aspects of Lean and Kanban. Our processes were born remotely and despite that, the pandemic pushed our meeting workload and our team health to the limits. We took a renewed view of the Lean principles that underpinned our processes to make adjustments to how work flows into the team, how the team organises themselves and how we work and live day to day. This session explores some Lean principles that are easily applied and complimentary to Scrum.

Speakers
avatar for Leigh Griffin

Leigh Griffin

Engineering Manager, Red Hat, Inc.
Engineering Manager and Agile Coach for Red Hat Mobile


Friday February 19, 2021 12:45pm - 1:25pm CET
Session Room 1

12:45pm CET

Coding Kubernetes for kids with Scratch and Che
Hey kids,
Do you know Scratch ? It is a programming tool for children. You can just use blocks to code your applications and share them with your friends.
During this talk, we will show you how you can interact with Kubernetes by using our custom Scratch blocks and how we have built these blocks with Eclipse Che.
Come and play with us.

Speakers
avatar for Ilya Buziuk

Ilya Buziuk

Principal Software Engineer, Red Hat
Software Engineer at Red Hat, Inc.Eclipse Che / JSDT committer. Work on Hosted Che (Eclipse Che hosted by Red Hat) - https://che.openshift.ioUsed to work on JBoss Tools - https://tools.jboss.orgSpeaker at various events:- EclipseCon France 2016- Eclipse Webinar series 2016- Eclipse... Read More →
avatar for Sun Tan

Sun Tan

Sr. Software Engineer, Red Hat
Sun is a Senior Software Engineer and a Java developer with 15 years experience, currently working at Red Hat. Sun is involved in the Eclipse Che project from the very beginning as a core contributor. Sun has the community in his heart and is devoted to open source. He has been contributing... Read More →


Friday February 19, 2021 12:45pm - 1:25pm CET
Session Room 5

12:45pm CET

Apache Kafka as a Monitoring Data Pipeline
Observability and monitoring are important parts of every platform and any application running on top of it, but it often doesn't get the attention it deserves. Only, when the first problems arise, monitoring gets into focus. Then the first production issues often discover the weaknesses in the monitoring solutions: missing, lost or delayed data, reliability issues, etc. When things go wrong, the monitoring tool chain comes under more pressure and issues become visible. Apache Kafka is often advertised as a streaming platform, but delivering logs and metrics is one of the most common use cases. This talk will explain the main advantages of using Kafka as a data pipeline in monitoring applications such as Fluentd or Jaeger tracing. A demo will show how to use Strimzi CNCF project to set up this stack.

Speakers
avatar for Jakub Scholz

Jakub Scholz

Principal Software Engineer, Red Hat
Jakub is one of the maintainers of the Strimzi project which is part of CNCF Sandbox and focuses on running Apache Kafka on Kubernetes. He is also a contributor to Apache Kafka itself. He currently works for Red Hat as Principal Software Engineer. Before joining Red Hat he worked... Read More →


Friday February 19, 2021 12:45pm - 1:25pm CET
Session Room 4

12:45pm CET

Multipath TCP hands-on on Fedora
with Multipath TCP (MPTCP) gradually improving its code maturity in the Linux kernel, users might be interested in configuring MPTCP, troubleshoot their connections, see how traffic is taking advantage of multiple paths between client and server. In this presentation, we will briefly see how to:
- inspect MPTCP sockets
- inspect MPTCP-specific MIB counters
- use mptcpd to configure behaviors at runtime

Speakers
avatar for Davide Caratti

Davide Caratti

software engineer, Red Hat
kernel developer at Networking Services Team
PA

Paolo Abeni

Red Hat
After a lifetime forcefully spent in closed source companies, Paolo Abeni is became recently a Linux kernel contributor, with primary area of interest in networking performances.


Friday February 19, 2021 12:45pm - 1:25pm CET
Session Room 7

12:45pm CET

Packit: 2 years of upstream ⟷ downstream
It's been two years since we started our project: Packit (https://packit.dev/). Packit is a tool and a service to help you integrate your open source projects with Red Hat's family of operating systems: Fedora Linux, Red Hat Enterprise Linux and CentOS Stream.

Lately, we've been busy working on a modern development workflow for CentOS Stream (which you can hear more about at a dedicated session) while keeping our GitHub app, Packit-as-a-Service, alive and evolving. You may be asking: what's new in packit lately, what can you do with it now and what's coming? This is the session to provide answers.

In this talk, you'll find out what Packit is, what we've been up to lately and what you can expect us to deliver this year. Demo included! This talk is followed by a workshop where most of the Packit engineers will hang out to help you set up Packit or answer your tricky questions.

Speakers
avatar for Tomas Tomecek

Tomas Tomecek

Principal Software Engineer, Red Hat
packit, containers, automation, and having all the fun
avatar for František Lachman

František Lachman

Software engineer, Red Hat, FI MUNI Brno
Python developer, Red-Hatter, teacher at FI MU, scout and climber.


Friday February 19, 2021 12:45pm - 1:25pm CET
Session Room 3

12:45pm CET

Creating Content for Automated Security Compliance
Do you want to automate security compliance to comply with not only industry standard security standards, but also to adhere to your organization’s specific security policies? In this workshop, you’ll learn how OpenSCAP and ComplianceAsCode project can help you to automate security compliance. You will:
- Learn about the ComplianceAsCode project to build security content from the source.
- Learn the basics of automated security scanning and remediations using OpenSCAP security scanner.
- Customize provided existing security content using SCAP Workbench.
- Create your own security policy from scratch.
- Learn about the Open Vulnerability and Assessment Language (OVAL) to write automated configurable security checks.
- Learn how to use Ansible with the ComplianceAsCode project to generate Ansible playbooks.

Note: This workshop is a self-paced lab with short introduction and instructor assistance.

Speakers
avatar for Gabriel Becker

Gabriel Becker

Software Developer, Red Hat
OpenSCAP and ComplianceAsCode Developer


Friday February 19, 2021 12:45pm - 1:25pm CET
x Workshop Room

1:00pm CET

Real-time Linux: what is next?
With the PREEMPT_RT mainlining, is the real-time Linux development ended? - No! It is the beginning of a new era. The low latency provided by the nowadays communication channels and the need for a software stack for AI/ML present on Linux is enabling a new class of cyber-physical systems that depends on real-time kernel. But, is the real-time kernel ready to be used in such scenarios? This presentation is a discussion about the current state of Real-time Linux. It will talk about the kind of determinism that is possible to obtain with Linux and the type of determinism that is still not possible to achieve. The main goal is to point to the next opportunities in the development that can enable Linux for a class of systems that requires more robust evidence of correctness, including the formal verification of the kernel and the mathematical analysis of the timing properties of the kernel.

Speakers

Friday February 19, 2021 1:00pm - 1:25pm CET
Session Room 2

1:00pm CET

DSP - custom SELinux policy modules done right
Decentralized SELinux policy project (DSP) is here to help developers ship custom SELinux policies together with their components. This allows for each package to be tested and delivered to users together with tailor-made security policy (as opposed to waiting for a new release of distribution policy).
In this talk I will show you what this process entails, list pros and cons, and explain how it influences the rest of the system. The newest addition to DSP is a test suite aimed at secure policy writing and proper packaging practises.

Speakers

Friday February 19, 2021 1:00pm - 1:25pm CET
Session Room 6

1:30pm CET

Break
Friday February 19, 2021 1:30pm - 2:00pm CET
Main Stage

2:00pm CET

Keynote Session - TBA
TBA


Friday February 19, 2021 2:00pm - 2:40pm CET
Main Stage

2:45pm CET

Benchmarking HPC workloads on OpenShift
In this session, we'll demonstrate how we used OpenShift as a proof-of-concept high-performance computing (HPC) platform for running scientific workload.
We'll present the set of tools and operators that were used to setup the HPC environment, then we'll introduce two scientific applications, Gromacs and Specfem, that we benchmarked on this cluster.
We'll detail in how we ran Specfem on OpenShift with the help of a K8s Go client coordinating the application build and execution; and we'll introduce the tool we designed to run the extensive benchmarking.
Finally, we'll present the performance results on a 32-node cluster comparing OpenShift with an identical bare-metal cluster.

Speakers
avatar for Kevin Pouget

Kevin Pouget

Senior Software Engineer, Red Hat


Friday February 19, 2021 2:45pm - 3:25pm CET
Session Room 5

2:45pm CET

Your Service is not Open Source
You may be thinking: 'Wait a second all my source code is shared right here. Of course it's open!'

Open Source is powered by a simple function: Converting a small percentage of users into contributors. In this talk we'll discuss how almost every Managed Service is developed and operated in such a way that prevents contributions from users. Left unchecked, the rapid adoption of Services would cause Open Source to shrivel.

Luckily there's a way we can change this. Let's take a look at how we can combine several existing DevOps, SRE and deployment principles to function as a true Open Source contribution model for Software as a Service.

Speakers
avatar for Stef Walter

Stef Walter

Hacker, manager, and CI freak., Red Hat
Stef is an avid open source hacker. He's contributed to over a hundred open source projects, and can be found preaching about continuous integration and working on the Cockpit Linux admin interface. He's a usability freak. Stef lives in Germany, and works at Red Hat.


Friday February 19, 2021 2:45pm - 3:25pm CET
Session Room 7

2:45pm CET

Project Shipwright: Build Container Images on k8s
Over the past decade, we have witnessed a dramatic shift in how developers package and deploy their source code. With Kubernetes, the unit of delivery has shifted from compiled binaries and scripts to container images. Assembling container images is not a simple task, requiring deep knowledge of a growing set of tools and technologies. This task becomes even more difficult when trying to replicate these processes on Kubernetes.

In this session we will introduce Shipwright, a vendor-neutral project that provides a framework for building container images on Kubernetes. We will discuss the origins of Shipwright, the objectives of the project, and demonstrate how Shipwright can be used to build a container image on Kubernetes using a wide variety of tools. Shipwright currently powers container image builds on IBM Code Engine, and will be used as the basis for OpenShift Builds v2 in the near future.

Speakers
avatar for Shoubhik Bose

Shoubhik Bose

Principal Software Engineer, Red Hat, Inc


Friday February 19, 2021 2:45pm - 3:25pm CET
Session Room 4

2:45pm CET

RHEL Kernel Workflow using GitLab
The Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) kernel has modernized its workflow using GitLab as its source forge. With the release of CentOS-Stream, most of this workflow will be made public. This talk will discuss how the team uses gitlab to manage its Enterprise workflow requirements. We will introduce the CI pieces using the Continuous Kernel Integration (CKI) Service, the cli tools we use, lab and bichon, and the challenges we are working on overcoming. In addition, there will be examples of how non-Red Hat developers will be able to contribute to this workflow. Attendees should understand how git and git forges like GitLab work and the basic idea of CI services. Understanding how kernel development works is helpful but not necessary. An attendee will walk away understanding how to apply this workflow to their projects and how to contribute to the RHEL kernel.

Speakers
avatar for Don Zickus

Don Zickus

Kernel Engineer, Red Hat
Senior Principle Kernel Engineer at Red Hat for over 13 years. I have been involved in most of the RHEL kernel process changes throughout those years and continue to work on making improvements. I have spent a number of years maintaining various drivers and subsystems for the RHEL... Read More →


Friday February 19, 2021 2:45pm - 3:25pm CET
Session Room 2

2:45pm CET

Get Quarkus Funqy the next time you hit a Serverless dance floor!
No doubt to transition existing cloud-native microservices to serverless functions anytime for optimizing resources on Kubernetes but also scaling out the functions in a variety of FaaS/Serverless platforms at speed. However, each platform provides different APIs, syntax, and runtime restrictions to write a function that is not enjoyable works for serverless developers. Quarkus Funqy aims to provide portable Java APIs for developers to write a function and make it deployable on multiple Serverless platforms(i.e. AWS Lambda, Azure Functions, Google Cloud Functions, Knative Eventing). In this session, we'll walk you through how Quarkus Funqy makes you(developer) dance on the Serverless floor for fun without code changes.

Speakers
avatar for Daniel Oh

Daniel Oh

Principal Technical Marketing Manager, Red Hat, Inc.
Daniel Oh is a principal technical product marketing manager at Red Hat and works CNCF/DOIS ambassador as well. He's well recognized in cloud-native app dev, senior DevOps practices in many open source projects and international conferences. Recently, he continues to evangelize enterprise... Read More →


Friday February 19, 2021 2:45pm - 3:25pm CET
Session Room 1

2:45pm CET

CentOS Stream at Facebook
We'll talk about how Facebook is leveraging CentOS Stream to manage our production fleet at scale. We'll cover the latest updates on our fleet migration from CentOS 7, talk about the tooling and processes we've developed and how they've evolved, and how we're working with the CentOS and Fedora communities. This talk is a followup to "Upgrading CentOS on the Facebook fleet" (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EajAjFCZz4Q&t=3s) from DevConf.cz 2020.

Speakers
DC

Davide Cavalca

Production Engineer, Facebook
Davide Cavalca is a Production Engineer at Facebook on the Operating Systems team, currently leading the fleet migration to CentOS 7. Before he worked on the ClusterOps team on capacity turnup automation, security and systems management. Davide has been w


Friday February 19, 2021 2:45pm - 3:25pm CET
Session Room 3

2:45pm CET

Lattice Based Cryptography Primer
Of all the new post quantum algorithms we are looking at to replace our traditional RSA and Eliptic Curve systems, Lattice base algorithms are both the most promising, but also the most opaque. NIST is almost certain to choose Lattice base as one of the algorithms they plan on standardizing on in 2021. This talk will help users who have a general feel for how RSA and ECC work get that same familiarity with Lattice functions. NIST is almost certain to choose Lattice base as one of the algorithms they plan on standardizing on in 2021.

Speakers
avatar for Bob Relyea

Bob Relyea

Principal Programmer, OASIS PKCS #11 co-chair., Red Hat
Bob Relyea is a principal programmer at Red Hat working on the Network Security System Library. Bob is also the co-chair for the OASIS PKCS #11 technical committee, having worked with PKCS #11 and PKCS #11 integration into NSS since 1995.


Friday February 19, 2021 2:45pm - 3:25pm CET
Session Room 6

2:45pm CET

Learning to DJ with open source software
If you've ever wondered what DJs do and how they do it (because you might want to do it too), check out this workshop!
We begin by discussing the basics of song structure and audio engineering most relevant to DJing. Next, we'll discuss some helpful concepts and common practices that will help your DJ sets flow. Finally, we'll show you how to work with FOSS DJ software Mixxx (mixxx.org) to prepare your music and perform it live.

Speakers

Friday February 19, 2021 2:45pm - 3:25pm CET
x Workshop Room

2:45pm CET

Cypress.io
This is a fundamentally new way of testing web applications. At Red Hat, we've started a user group for Cypress.io and this has enabled us to solve common problems together.

In this session, we can get together to identify some of the common problems and solutions which may impact our team's use of this new technology.

Speakers
avatar for John Hill

John Hill

Senior Automation Engineer, Red Hat


Friday February 19, 2021 2:45pm - 3:45pm CET
x Meetup Room

3:30pm CET

Create your own Fedora image & push it to cloud
Are you using Fedora images in AWS or Azure? During the last year, Image Builder gained the capability to push customized images directly to cloud providers. We have also changed the default backend from lorax-composer to osbuild-composer.

During this talk we will introduce you to the latest news in Fedora Image Builder, explain why we switched the backend, and we will show you how to create your own custom images and upload them directly to AWS.

Speakers
MS

Martin Sehnoutka

Software Engineer, Red Hat


Friday February 19, 2021 3:30pm - 3:55pm CET
Session Room 5

3:30pm CET

A practical guide to contributing: Node.js and oth
Based on conversations and interviews with a variety of collaborators and maintainers from a number of open-source projects, we'll explore the ways in which you can become a valuable contributor to a project and its community. If you're new to open-source, we'll touch on how to get started, best practices, where to look for help and how to identify good communities. If you are already involved, we'll discuss how to make your environment more welcoming and how you can help new folks be successful. We'll focus on a number of OpenJS projects including Node.js and its many teams and working groups (Releases, Package Maintenance, Security, Modules, etc.), but the takeaways can apply to any open-source project. We'll even spend a moment on open-governance and how foundations work. It'll be fun!

Speakers
avatar for Joe Sepi

Joe Sepi

Open-Source Engineer, IBM


Friday February 19, 2021 3:30pm - 3:55pm CET
Session Room 7

3:30pm CET

Ansible with Edge Computing
In this meeting, we will go over the Edge Computing architecture and explain how Edge Computing can be applied with Ansible. Ansible is a mature open source project that supports automation across multiple platforms. Ansiable also provides many layer of deployment security. The Edge Computing Data Centers can be built on top of Openshift leveraging different Openshift Features such as Cloud Native Tool Kits, Microservice Framework and container technologies. Edge Computing Operational Manager can communicate with different Edge Computing Running Platform. The Edge Computing Running Platform would have an external gateway that hooked up to the 3Scale API management. All these different deployments can be orchestrated using Ansible. We will go over a few examples and get your started using Ansible Edge Computing.

Speakers
avatar for Ip Sam

Ip Sam

Red Hat Certified Architect, Red Hat
Ip Sam is a Red Hat Certified Architect with expertise in OpenShift, Ansible, Cloud Infrastructure, Micro Services.


Friday February 19, 2021 3:30pm - 3:55pm CET
Session Room 4

3:30pm CET

Automatic aiding system for Linux kernel using ML.
The Linux kernel is a complex operating system with lots of asynchronous tasks running at the same time.
When the kernel encounters an error, it can print parts of its internal state to console (Linux kernel error message) and also it can save parts of its memory to disk for later manual analysis.
An analysis of such error messages or saved memory content requires a trained individual who understands the internal workings and structures of the Linux kernel.

For some time I am working on a tool, that with the aid of machine learning would help Red Hat employees and customers to do initial triage by them self, without need of a technical advisor.

My presentation is about where I got so far, how it internally works and where I am heading in the future.

Speakers
avatar for Rado Vrbovsky

Rado Vrbovsky

Senior Kernel Engineer, Red Hat


Friday February 19, 2021 3:30pm - 3:55pm CET
Session Room 2

3:30pm CET

Service Mesh, Serverless, and Event Driven Archite
Event Driven Architecture (EDA) is the formal name for things like Serverless and Service Meshes. Have you seen all the hype about it? Wondering whether you care? Well, this talk will walk through why an EDA is so interesting via demos of a live system.

We will also touch on the numerous upstream projects that deliver on this funcationality. Examples include Istio, Knative, Kiali, Jaeger all of which will be briefly covered but, importantly, also demo'd.

Speakers
avatar for Langdon White

Langdon White

Platform Architect, Red Hat
Passionate technical leader with a proven success record architecting and implementing high-impact software systems for companies ranging from startups to large companies. Participated as an executive, architect, and developer for over 150 projects. In-depth knowledge and experience... Read More →


Friday February 19, 2021 3:30pm - 3:55pm CET
Session Room 1

3:30pm CET

Managing Standard Operating Envs with Ansible
Many organizations have a Standard Operating Environment (SOE) for their machines which consists of configuration for storage, network, logging, metrics, kernel settings, firewall, selinux, and more. For example, QE machines in a certain lab may need a certain partition layout, network connections for NFS, firewall to allow certain applications to access, etc. In this presentation we show how Linux System Roles can be used to manage the SOEs for your machines.

Speakers
avatar for Richard Megginson

Richard Megginson

Senior Principal Software Engineer, Red Hat


Friday February 19, 2021 3:30pm - 3:55pm CET
Session Room 3

3:30pm CET

Making heads or tails of TLS certificate errors
The ecosystem of TLS certificates is rather complicated. Just OpenSSL has over 75 different possible errors only related to certificate validation, some of them somewhat cryptic. Furthermore, other libraries have incompatible error sets, complicating knowledge transfer.
Usable X.509 Errors (https://x509errors.org) is a project attempting to improve the situation. It compares errors from commonly used libraries (OpenSSL, GnuTLS, Botan, mbedTLS), consolidating the corresponding documentation from all those libraries in a single place. It tries to explain what the validation errors mean by devising better documentation and providing ready-to-use sample certificates for testing.
The presented research is a part of the academic cooperation of Red Hat Czech and Masaryk University.

Speakers
avatar for Martin Ukrop

Martin Ukrop

researcher, teacher, Masaryk University
Passionate about usable security, user experience, teaching and experiential learning. Actively organizing educational events in the community "Instruktoři Brno". Ceaselessly fascinated by the world.
avatar for Pavol Žáčik

Pavol Žáčik

Student, Masaryk University
Student, begginer security researcher at CRoCS - Masaryk University.


Friday February 19, 2021 3:30pm - 3:55pm CET
Session Room 6

4:00pm CET

Break
Friday February 19, 2021 4:00pm - 4:30pm CET
Main Stage

4:30pm CET

Machine API in OpenShift - Deep DIve
How does OpenShift handle node host provisioning management actions? It's all done by Machine API, a cloud agnostic API that allows handling hosts for nodes in the same declarative way you handle pods. Join this session get a deep dive and also hear about things like Machine Health Checks and Cluster Autoscaler.

Speakers

Friday February 19, 2021 4:30pm - 4:55pm CET
Session Room 5

4:30pm CET

Making Kubernetes Safer with User Namespaces
Namespaces are a fundamental building block of containers that provide isolation to avoid them interfering with each other. Linux supports different namespaces to isolate different system resources like network stack, process IDs, cgroups, etc.

User namespaces provide user IDs and group IDs isolation. A process can have different user and group IDs inside and outside of a user namespace. In particular, a process can be privileged (UID 0) inside a user namespace and have an unprivileged ID outside. User namespaces work together with other namespaces to allow a process to perform privileged operations in the namespaces it's running in without affecting other namespaces. For instance, a process can configure the network interface of the network namespace it's running in but not on other namespaces.

Running a process as root inside containers is a security risk, if such a process is able to break out of the container into the host, it can cause considerable damage as it'll be running as a privileged user there. User namespaces offer a solution for this problem making it possible to run processes as root in the containers while being non-root in the host. In this case, the effect of a process breaking into the host is more limited as it won't have root privileges.

User namespaces are supported in some container runtimes but Kubernetes doesn't support them yet. We have been working together with different communities to fill this gap by gathering use cases. We created a Kubernetes Enhancement Proposal (https://github.com/kubernetes/enhancements/pull/2101) with a plan to bring this support in the incoming Kubernetes releases. We have also implemented a prototype of this idea in Kubernetes and the containerd/cri runtime.

In this talk, I'll introduce user namespaces and how they can increase the security of a Kubernetes cluster. I'll explain how we are working with the community to bring this support to Kubernetes, the challenges we are facing to support volumes and how different approaches like shiftfs and idmapped mounts are trying to fix them.

Speakers
avatar for Mauricio Vásquez Bernal

Mauricio Vásquez Bernal

Software Engineer, Kinvolk
Mauricio is a contributor of the BCC project. He is part of the Kinvolk Labs team and he is interested in BPF, Kubernetes, networking and low level programming. Before joining Kinvolk, Mauricio worked implementing high performance virtual network functions with BPF. Mauricio loves... Read More →


Friday February 19, 2021 4:30pm - 4:55pm CET
Session Room 7

4:30pm CET

Writing native GUI applications in GTK
Learn how you can write native desktop applications with GTK by watching a live coding session where we are going to write a simple web browser to show how easy and powerful GTK is.

Speakers
avatar for Felipe Borges

Felipe Borges

Senior Software Engineer, Red Hat
Felipe Borges has been involved in GNOME since 2009, contributing with translation, marketing, and development. Currently contributes to various GNOME components and is the maintainer of GNOME Boxes.


Friday February 19, 2021 4:30pm - 4:55pm CET
Session Room 3

4:30pm CET

Formula 1 telemetry processing using Kafka Streams
Apache Kafka is the de facto data streaming platform used for ingesting vast amounts of data and processing them in real-time. Low latency analytics are vital if users are to react to events as fast as possible and to effectively shape future decision making. The Apache Kafka upstream community provides the Kafka Streams library for simplifying the development of highly scalable applications for filtering, mapping, transforming, and enriching these data.
During this session, we will explore how we can use Kafka Streams to help a Formula 1 team gain insights during a race. The 'real' data will come from a well-known racing game and will be processed by our application in real-time, making us feel like real track-side F1 engineers!


Friday February 19, 2021 4:30pm - 4:55pm CET
Session Room 4

4:30pm CET

Scheduling and Load Balancing in RHEL8 and Beyond
Deciding which task to run when and where is the job of the kernel scheduler. This is a piece of the plumbing and, as such, should generally not be visible when it's working well. We present a brief overview of scheduling and load balancing in the Linux kernel followed by a summary of some of the changes that have been made to the scheduler in the RHEL8 minor releases. We then discuss some of the future features being worked on in the upstream kernel which may be seen in later RHEL kernels. This talk will go into some detail but generally will be broad enough to be interesting to anyone curious about what's going on in the kernel process scheduling area.

Speakers
PA

Philip Auld

Red Hat Inc


Friday February 19, 2021 4:30pm - 4:55pm CET
Session Room 2

4:30pm CET

Kubernetes Native with MicroProfile and Quarkus
Java doesn't work well in a container on Kubernetes right? Too big? Too slow to start? Not anymore with Quarkus! Quarkus significantly reduces the container resource requirements for memory and startup, while still supporting standard APIs like Eclipse MicroProfile.

Speakers
avatar for Roberto Cortez

Roberto Cortez

Self Employed
Freelancer, Speaker, RebelLabs Author, Blogger, Passionate Developer My name is Roberto Cortez and I was born in Venezuela, but I have spent most of my life in Coimbra – Portugal, where I currently live. I am a professional Java Developer working in the software development industry... Read More →


Friday February 19, 2021 4:30pm - 5:10pm CET
Session Room 1

4:30pm CET

Rekor - Cryptographic software release ledger
This will be a talk about a new project called 'rekor'. Rekor is a project to provide a cryptographic, immutable, append only software release ledger using merkle trees. Rekor is being developed in collaboration between Red Hat OCTO and Google.

Speakers
LH

Luke Hinds

Engineer, Red Hat
I work in the CTO office of Red Hat with a focus on Security.


Friday February 19, 2021 4:30pm - 5:10pm CET
Session Room 6

4:30pm CET

Public Cloud Meetup
Let's talk about your operational and technical goals, your security requirements, and how you are using tools from our joint communities to meet your requirements. Let's discuss concerns related to security and how you plan to leverage standards and what you think is important for next generation success in this space for your success.

Speakers

Friday February 19, 2021 4:30pm - 5:30pm CET
x Meetup Room

4:45pm CET

Understanding root inside and outside a container
Do you run your containers as root, or as a regular user? It’s such a deceptively simple question. You might be tempted to answer too quickly. Is the threat model really crystal clear in your mind? I have a suspicion that it might not be. This workshop is intended to help clarify.

Before you can answer the question above, you need to determine if we are talking about the container engine (Podman, Docker, CRI-O, containerd, etc), the process inside of the container (apache, postgresql, mysql, etc) or the process ID the container is mapped to (all three can be different). At first glance, this might not be obvious. Either the container engine or its sub-process in containers can be run as virtually any user. This workshop will walk through understanding root inside and outside the container so that you can better model threads, risks and mitigation with containers.

Speakers

Friday February 19, 2021 4:45pm - 5:25pm CET
x Workshop Room

5:00pm CET

Honey, I shrunk the pods (and everything else)
Kata Containers runs your existing containers in their own virtual machine. It lets you combine the ecosystem of containers with the features of virtual machines. A problem with this approach is that it uses more resources than traditional container runtimes. In this session, we will discuss the current state of affairs and various attempts at making things a little better.

When you run Kata Containers along with Kubernetes or OpenShift, a pod is a virtual machine. This means that you need a hypervisor and a guest kernel. This consumes memory, disk space, and causes overhead in the networking and storage stacks. From a business perspective, this directly impacts how many containers you can start. So it is a legitimate effort to shave off as much as we can on every front.

First, we will do a review of where we stand today, i.e. how much memory and disk space is consumed by the various components, and the kind of overhead we are talking about regarding storage and networking. Then we will show where we can expect some serious improvements. Finally, we will discuss how we can deliver these optimizations in practice, and let actual use cases guide us in prioritising the effort.

We will then see how we can save quite a bit of memory and disk space for qemu (and why that matters in practice). On the storage front, we will highlight the differences between virtiofs and 9p, and the work that remains to be done, notably with respect to caching and memory usage. On the networking front, we will see how the problem is now largely solved if you have the right hardware, using SR-IOV and DPDK โ€“ย which are the topic of a dedicated talk - and discuss remaining issues.

Finally, we will cover a few longer-term prospects, notably with respect to qemu and libvirt modularization efforts, as well as more radical efforts such as libkrun, and how these prospects matter for Kata Containers as well as other consumers of these tools.

Speakers
avatar for Christophe de Dinechin

Christophe de Dinechin

SPICE developer at Red Hat, founder of the Tao3D project, Red Hat
Christophe works on SPICE and 3D virtualization at Red Hat. He's passionate about 3D, virtualization and programming languages. His GitHub page is http://github.com/c3d.


Friday February 19, 2021 5:00pm - 5:25pm CET
Session Room 5

5:00pm CET

Building Flatpaks from Fedora RPMs
Some of you may know flatpaks as a new way to distribute your applications. But did you know there is a direct way to turn your Fedora RPM package into flatpak in the Fedora infrastructure? We will show how this infrastructure and the whole process work and how you could convert your own application.

Speakers

Friday February 19, 2021 5:00pm - 5:25pm CET
Session Room 3

5:00pm CET

Building High Quality OpenShift Applications
In this meeting, we will go over examples of high quality OpenShift applications including best development practices, guidelines and principles. We will review some commonly made mistakes, and talk more ways to solve them. We will review metrics that we could use to track quality in our application, and look at different ways to measure the performance and quality.

Speakers
avatar for Ip Sam

Ip Sam

Red Hat Certified Architect, Red Hat
Ip Sam is a Red Hat Certified Architect with expertise in OpenShift, Ansible, Cloud Infrastructure, Micro Services.


Friday February 19, 2021 5:00pm - 5:25pm CET
Session Room 4

5:00pm CET

Create your own custom Fedora IoT images
Would you like to build your own Fedora IoT image? As you probably already know, Fedora IoT images are immutable system images using the OSTree technology, for Internet of Things and Device Edge ecosystems. Wouldn't it be great if you could create your own customized images and OSTree commits? Fedora Image Builder enables you to do exactly this!

In this talk, you will learn how to use Image Builder to create OSTree images and commits.

Speakers
MS

Martin Sehnoutka

Software Engineer, Red Hat


Friday February 19, 2021 5:00pm - 5:25pm CET
Session Room 2

5:00pm CET

virtio-mem goes to Windows
virtio-mem is to provide a flexible, cross-architecture memory hot(un)plug solution for guests. The initial focus is x86-64 with Linux. But how's about Windows? Is this possible to develop a driver supporting virtio-mem? This presentation is about the challenges of implementing a Windows driver.

Speakers
MK

Marek Kedzierski

Senior Software Engineer, Red Hat
I work in the virtio-win team. I'm interested in 3D graphics, virtualization, reverse engineering, and low level system programming.


Friday February 19, 2021 5:00pm - 5:25pm CET
Session Room 7

5:30pm CET

Serverless Functions: CLI to Cluster in 3 Minutes
Six years ago, Amazon introduced Lambda, an event driven serverless computing platform, ushering in a new era and ways of thinking about application development. The three pillars of this shift are events, serverless compute resources, and functions. Today, the landscape around these technologies has exploded. Projects such as Knative and the Cloud Native Computing Foundation's Buildpacks, and CloudEvents provide the foundational tools to deliver event driven functional programming to the Kubernetes platform. Attendees will learn about these and other open source technologies, and I will demonstrate how OpenShift Serverless Functions are built on top of these building blocks to deliver a great platform for running functions on OpenShift.

Speakers
avatar for Lance Ball

Lance Ball

Principal Software Engineer, Red Hat
Lance is a Principal Software Engineer at Red Hat, and the product architect for OpenShift Serverless Functions. Previously, Lance lead the Node.js engineering efforts within Red Hat Middleware. He is an active open source contributor and an author of several NPM modules. In addition... Read More →


Friday February 19, 2021 5:30pm - 6:10pm CET
Session Room 5

5:30pm CET

Exploring the world while seeing nothing
How do visually impaired people work with computers and how can they explore their surroundings? It's not easy and the available software tools may help the visually impaired users a lot or, on the other hand, they can exclude them. This presentation will provide an insight into how visually impaired users can interact with the world using computers and Open Source software, from connecting the necessary devices to a computer and starting an accessible desktop, to running a street view application and struggling with bugs.

The presentation will demonstrate how a visually impaired user can (or cannot) work with computers on GNU/Linux in practice. A cross-platform street view application, Feel the streets, will be presented. It allows visually impaired users to virtually walk across cities using data from OpenStreetMap and to explore streets and interesting objects around the way.

The need for cooperation between visually impaired and sighted developers will be emphasized. After this presentation, you should have an idea how visually impaired users work with computers, how to enable accessibility on GNU/Linux and what you can do to make the life of visually impaired computer users easier, or at least not harder.

There are visually impaired employees at Red Hat. Red Hat supports various diversity & inclusion initiatives and cooperation with students. Lukáš is a visually impaired intern at Red Hat, working on his master thesis about Feel the streets within the academic cooperation between Red Hat and Faculty of Informatics at Masaryk University in Brno.


Friday February 19, 2021 5:30pm - 6:10pm CET
Session Room 3

5:30pm CET

Power-Up With Clouds And Pipelines
Mario is a software developer. He used to send his code to Luigi so he could deploy them on their servers, but he now want to embrace DevOps principles and work together with Luigi to deploy his applications. This is where Tekton Pipelines will come to help them. Tekton is a flexible, Kubernetes native open source CI/CD framework that enables automating deployments across multiple platformsโ€”including Kubernetes, serverless, and VMsโ€”by abstracting away the underlying details. During this talk, the attendees will learn some of the Tekton resources, how to install the pipelines and how to run them for building, testing and deploying containerized applications on their clusters.

Speakers
avatar for Joel Lord

Joel Lord

Technical Evangelist, Auth0
Joel Lord is passionate about IoT, AI, JavaScript and the web in general. In his spare time, Joel shares his findings via his blog Javascript Everything.He is currently a Technical Evangelist at Auth0, is a part-time teacher at the Algonquin College in programming and is involved in various developer communities of the Ottawa-Gatineau area. He is also involved with OSMI, which helps to fight the stigma around mental health issues in... Read More →


Friday February 19, 2021 5:30pm - 6:10pm CET
Session Room 4

5:30pm CET

Building together a Sustainable future
Building together a Sustainable future: How technology can pave way towards Sustainability
As a Technical Architect at Microsoft, I am privileged to talk to a new customer every single day. As the world moves into the new normal, I will present on one of the key areas on Interest across industries today - Sustainability and how organizations that have a head start in this field will really benefit in the longer run.
Modern buildings contain complex mechanical devices, sophisticated control systems and a suite of features to improve the energy blueprint. As part of the Microsoft WW Sustainability team, I will go through Microsoft's sustainability approach to understand how technology can pave way for your organization to become Carbon negative and how any organization can leverage the blueprint to initiate their sustainability journey.
The talk will consist of a demo about how we as Microsoft are currently leveraging the power of IoT and Azure Digital Twins to understand our current carbon footprint, build insights on the data collated and garner actionable on those insights. We will showcase how my team internally has used this approach within Microsoft to solve a problem pertaining to a global crisis we all are witnessing.

Speakers

Friday February 19, 2021 5:30pm - 6:10pm CET
Session Room 2

5:30pm CET

Tune Kafka to "speak" with (almost) everything
Apache Kafka is getting used as an event backbone in new organizations everyday. We would love to send every byte of data through the event bus. However, most of the time, connecting to simple third party applications and services becomes a headache that involves several lines of code and additional applications. As a result, connecting Kafka to services like Google Sheets, communication tools such as Slack or Telegram, or even the omnipresent Salesforce, is a challenge nobody wants to face. Wouldn't you like to have hundreds of connectors readily available out-of-the-box to solve this problem?

Due to these challenges, communities like Apache Camel are working on how to speed up development on key areas of the modern application, like integration. The Camel Kafka Connect project, from the Apache foundation, has enabled their vastly set of connectors to interact with Kafka Connect natively. So, developers can start sending and receiving data from Kafka to and from their preferred services and applications in no time without a single line of code.

In summary, during this session we will:

Introduce you to the Camel Kafka Connector sub-project from Apache Camel
Go over the list of connectors available as part of the project
Showcase a couple examples of integrations using the connectors
Share some guidelines on how to get started with the Camel Kafka Connectors

Speakers
avatar for Hugo Guerrero

Hugo Guerrero

APIs & Messaging Developer Advocate, Red Hat, Inc.
Hugo Guerrero works at Red Hat as an APIs and messaging developer advocate. In this role, he helps the marketing team with technical overview and support to create, edit, and curate product content shared with the community through webinars, conferences, and other activities. With... Read More →


Friday February 19, 2021 5:30pm - 6:10pm CET
Session Room 1

5:30pm CET

Security Scanning - Past/Present/Future
How can you be sure your bare metal, virtual machines or containers are secure and do not contain any known vulnerabilities? How much can you trust your security scanner? How has the security scanning landscape changed over the years and what is next? What are the proverbial pits that security scanners often fall into? Those are some of the questions that we will try to answer in this talk. These answers largely depend on what security metadata is available for the software you are using and so we will cover common security metadata formats, sources and how to use them effectively. We will focus on standard formats such as OVAL and CVRF and several vendor sources

Speakers
avatar for Stanislav Ochotnický

Stanislav Ochotnický

Software Engineer, Red Hat Product Security DevOps, Red Hat
Stanislav has been at Red Hat for almost 11 years at this point. Starting as a maintainer within Red Hat Enterprise Linux engineering, spending a few years as a business analyst and finally returning to engineering side by joining internal tooling DevOps teams. He is currently working... Read More →
MP

Martin Prpič

Senior Software Engineer, Red Hat


Friday February 19, 2021 5:30pm - 6:10pm CET
Session Room 6

5:30pm CET

libkrun: KVM-based isolation for your workloads
In this talk I'll be presenting libkrun, a dynamic library that provides KVM-based process isolation capabilities to other programs. Combined with an OCI runtime, enables podman to run VM-isolated containers. Combined with an HTTP server, it enables it to self-isolate in a compact VM without requiring any additional configuration nor maintenance.

libkrun enables KVM to go beyond the realm of traditional virtualization providing a novel approach to the concept of lightweight and compact VMs.

Speakers
avatar for Sergio Lopez Pascual

Sergio Lopez Pascual

Senior Software Engineer, Red Hat
Software Engineer working in the Virtualization Team.


Friday February 19, 2021 5:30pm - 6:10pm CET
Session Room 7

5:30pm CET

Consuming CentOS Stream
This is the place where you can try CentOS Stream. What’s that? It’s the latest development version of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8. You have a unique opportunity now since all the CentOS Stream developers will be present and can answer your questions.

This is not just a Q&A session, we’ll show you how to get CentOS Stream, what are all the delivery mechanisms, how to migrate from CentOS Linux 8 to CentOS Stream and may also peek behind the scenes how the distribution is being made.

We suggest downloading a VM image before the workshop to save time: https://www.centos.org/centos-stream/

Speakers
avatar for Tomas Tomecek

Tomas Tomecek

Principal Software Engineer, Red Hat
packit, containers, automation, and having all the fun
avatar for Brian Stinson

Brian Stinson

Systems Administrator
Systems Administrator


Friday February 19, 2021 5:30pm - 6:10pm CET
x Workshop Room
 
Saturday, February 20
 

9:00am CET

Keynote Session - TBA
TBA


Saturday February 20, 2021 9:00am - 9:40am CET
Main Stage

9:45am CET

From Jenkins-under-your-desk to resilient service
Red Hat's CKI ("cookie") project started out as a Jenkins proof-of-concept to show that kernel testing can be integrated into the kernel workflow.

Today, CKI provides all the infrastructure that stands between a merge request for a Fedora/CentOS/RHEL kernel repository on gitlab.com and the green check mark that signals that it can be merged.

Join us in our journey of how a bunch of engineers (that couldn't spell DevOps correctly) learned to operate a fast-moving resilient service used by kernel developers in their daily work.

We will talk about:

How we keep the CKI service up and running by
- using a state-of-the art logging, monitoring and alerting setup
- being persistent in the case of transient failures
- reducing single-point-of-failure

How we make it easy to modify the testing pipeline by
- running canary pipelines for unmerged code

How we make it safe to hack on the underlying infrastructure by
- dividing the backend infrastructure into microservices
- automatically deploying testing versions for merge requests
- automating production deployments

Speakers
IM

Inaki Malerba

Software Engineer, Red Hat


Saturday February 20, 2021 9:45am - 10:25am CET
Session Room 2

9:45am CET

Toolbox - interactive container environment
Operating systems like Fedora Silverblue, Fedora CoreOS, and many others that use OSTree or other technologies are on the rise. While solving many problems, they introduce their own set. Few of them are tackled by Toolbox, a tool for creating an interactive container-based environment.

This talk will show how Toolbox operates, how it can be used for software development and software debugging (both through command-line and GUI apps), how a toolbox-based workflow can be useful even on "classic" Linux distributions, what were the recent accomplished milestones, and what are the plans for the future development of the tool.

While knowledge of containers is very helpful to understand all concepts around Toolbox, they are not required.

Speakers
OM

Ondřej Míchal

Intern, Red Hat


Saturday February 20, 2021 9:45am - 10:25am CET
Session Room 1

9:45am CET

A different flavor of the distributed transaction
Transactions are one of the most complex and yet very important areas of computing. They can get particularly hard when the system moves to the distributed environments as almost every component in the distributed system is liable to failures. Traditional locking protocols, used in transaction solutions today, are then very prone to holding locks on resources for unnecessarily long periods. The saga pattern provides an alternative non-blocking solution with the design that allows individual parts of the transaction to commited immediately and independently. This design is specifically suitable for long running transactions and distributed systems. In this session, we will present a newly created MicroProfile specification called Long Running Actions (LRA) which provides a definition of the transactional protocol and a simple API for the distributed transactions in the Java microservices environment based on the saga pattern. We will show you why the saga pattern is a very suitable transactional solution for many distributed microservices applications and demonstrate the usage of the LRA specification with the live coded demo.

Speakers
avatar for Martin Štefanko

Martin Štefanko

Senior software engineer, Red Hat
a software engineer working mainly on Red Hat middleware runtimes technologies like WildFly / JBoss EAP application servers, Thorntail, Quarkus and individual components that are included in these projects like RESTEasy, Weld or Hibernate. He is also actively participating in MicroProfile... Read More →


Saturday February 20, 2021 9:45am - 10:25am CET
Session Room 4

9:45am CET

Introducing Subatomic Infinispan Client
Infinispan Client Quarkus allows you to write your enterprise apps as you have done in the past with Hibernate/JAX-RS, but also to compile these applications to a Graal-VM native image. Running in a native image allows for the application to be started up in mere milliseconds, depending upon the app, all while using much less memory.
Topics to be covered in session:
1. Infinispan features that are being used:
Create stores dynamically
Simple get/put operations
Full-text query
Continuous query
2. Quarkus features:
REST web-service
Application properties
Application life cycle events listeners


Speakers
VS

Varsha Sharma

Associate Technical Engineer, Red Hat, Inc.
Obsessed with learning new things.
avatar for Durgesh Anaokar

Durgesh Anaokar

Senior Software Maintenance Engineer, Red Hat
I am a Senior Software Maintenance Engineer, working for Red Hat. I mainly work with product like Red Hat Data Grid, Infinispan. I also work on JVM related issues and therefore I also look into other middleware products.


Saturday February 20, 2021 9:45am - 10:25am CET
Session Room 5

9:45am CET

Ansible deployment and management updates for IdM
The talk will show the additions and enhancements for the deployment and management of IdM based solutions using Ansible with the ansible-freeipa project. This includes Ansible roles and modules to automate functions related to deployment and configuration as well as maintenance of IdM. The talk will provide an overview over new modules and roles in ansible-freeipa, like for example DNS and RBAC modules and also backup and restore roles. A demo will show the deployment of a IdM cluster with server, replicas and clients and also the use of several management modules.

Speakers
avatar for Thomas Woerner

Thomas Woerner

Senior Software Engineer, Red Hat, Inc.
Senior Software Engineer


Saturday February 20, 2021 9:45am - 10:25am CET
Session Room 3

9:45am CET

Containers are Linux - but what does it mean?
"Containers are Linux" is an interesting and bold statement that you might have read in blogs or seen on T-shirts. Do you know what it really means though?

In this workshop, we will guide you through the processes of running a fully functioning container without the usage of tools such as Docker, Podman or Kubernetes. Indeed, everything you need to start a container on your laptop is a couple of commands like chroot, unshare, mount and few others - all of them natively present on most Linux distributions. We believe that this hands-on experience will help you understand how containers are implemented on the low level.

Requirements: Linux workstation (virtual machine will do just fine). Even though it's possible to run containers on other operating systems with the usage of specialized tools, we won't have capacity to guide you through that process.

Speakers
JZ

Jan Zmeškal

Software Engineer, Red Hat
I've spent most of my technical career so far as a Quality Engineer, primarily testing Red Hat Virtualization's integration with other products of Red Hat portfolio. In 2020, I switched to Software Engineering path and now I'm developing container image security scanner clair.


Saturday February 20, 2021 9:45am - 10:25am CET
x Workshop Room

9:45am CET

Fedora ELN Meetup
Meet with Fedora ELN SIG and anyone interested in the ELN work to discuss the state of the project, work items and future goals.

Speakers
AF

Aleksandra Fedorova

CI Engineer, Red Hat
Member of FESCo and Fedora CI SIG, interested in CI/CD, Fedora & RHEL CI and GatingFedora FAS: bookwar


Saturday February 20, 2021 9:45am - 10:45am CET
x Meetup Room

10:30am CET

DevOps, but you don't need to be an enterprise
My heart skips a beat every time there's the *new tool that will solve your DevOps*. Working in a team, one can realize fairly fast that the tooling is not the problem most of the time. People are. In this talk, I want to zoom in on the possibilities of building a DevOps *culture*, instead of investing millions into tooling and wasting the time of people constantly re-learning new tools.

Agenda:
- The rabbit holes of DevOps
- No, DevOps is not a single person working for two
- Don't pick what you want, pick what you need
- Tools don't work autonomously - one tool at a time -
- How automation wastes time in certain situations
- Make a consensus

Speakers
avatar for Peter Malina

Peter Malina

CTO, FlowUp
Google Developer Expert for GCP, CTO @FlowUp


Saturday February 20, 2021 10:30am - 10:55am CET
Session Room 2

10:30am CET

OpenShift Pipelines using Tekton
I am going to show how to install OpenShift Pipelines via an operator, how to create Kubernetes custom resources based on Tekton, how to use the Tekton CLI, and discusses high-level concepts of Tekton. The result of this session is showing how to deploy a sample application out to an OpenShift 4 cluster using a Tekton pipeline.

Speakers
avatar for Amit Nijhawan

Amit Nijhawan

STSE, Red Hat
I am working as middleware engineer in red hat.


Saturday February 20, 2021 10:30am - 10:55am CET
Session Room 5

10:30am CET

debuginfod: get debugging data + sources easily
Developers and troubleshooters often need to debug binaries. Often, these binaries are running in deployments where the DWARF debuginfo & source code are not already there. So a troubleshooter must either make do without, or download them. On Fedora/RHEL family distros, and on many others, manual & privileged steps are often required.

elfutils debuginfod was released at the end of 2019 to start making it easy to distribute such debugging artifacts to all sorts of debugging-like tools across a network. We now have client support in almost all major tools, and servers you can easily run for yourself. We also have servers coming online for major distros. The effect is that if your machine can talk HTTP, it can make debugging & exploration of the system painless and quick. That includes servers and containers too.

We will discuss installation, client usage and API, server configuration & management, and maybe sneak in a demo or two.

Speakers

Saturday February 20, 2021 10:30am - 10:55am CET
Session Room 1

10:30am CET

UPt! Your Provisioning of Linux Machines
Red Hat contributes to stabilizing the upstream linux kernel using its
Enterprise class hardware.
For many years, this hardware has been managed through Beaker,
a software for managing and automating labs of test computers.
Beaker is used often, especially when testing different architectures and
special hardware.

However, in some cases, for example when generic x86_64 devices suffice,
it is easier to take advantage of stable infrastructure of different providers.
As providers appear, evolve their services and add non x86_64 hardware, it is
suddenly important to be able to target these providers for running tasks
and scaling-out testing.

Once a system is up, a testing harness called restraint allows a relatively
low-level and lightweight way to ensure tasks are executed. Beaker has used
this harness for some time. It fulfills important requirements for kernel testing,
such as being reliable, being able to handle machine reboots and more.

Because of CKI (Continuous Kernel Integration) team's need to scale-out to
different providers, I've written UPT project (Unified Provisioning Tool) to
simplify provisioning and Restraint Test Runner take advantage of restraint
for (kernel and non-kernel) test running.

This talk will briefly discuss current approach towards running (primarily
kernel) tests and targeting different cloud providers.

This talk will discuss the aforementioned tools, their capabilities and features
to execute tasks, run tests, simplify test result interpretation, provide partial
test results and handle unexpected behavior.

As different tools in the open source community evolve as well, we will also
discuss possible cooperation, as this is already on the radar.

We encourage you to share and invite people who might be interested; this talk
is suitable for anyone in kernel testing/tools, CI and related topics.

Speakers
JR

Jakub Racek

software engineer, Red Hat
Red Hat software engineer, former kernel maintainer


Saturday February 20, 2021 10:30am - 10:55am CET
Session Room 4

10:30am CET

Life Amongst the Authentica-ceans 🦀
Authentication and IDM technologies are at the core of our system and network security. Whether it's logging into our personal laptop, or a corporate website, authentication is how we define roles and privileges to our users and ourselves. Opensource has a number of IDM offerings, as do corporate offerings. In this talk, we'll explore some of the history of these projects and what they offer, the direction that authentication and security is moving in. We'll also introduce Kanidm, a new opensource IDM system that has been created to adapt to these changes in IDM and security, and talk about what it's achieved in a short space of time, and what the future holds for it.

Speakers
avatar for William Brown

William Brown

Senior Software Engineer, SUSE
Identity Management, LDAP, Security, Rust


Saturday February 20, 2021 10:30am - 10:55am CET
Session Room 3

11:00am CET

Break
Saturday February 20, 2021 11:00am - 11:30am CET
Main Stage

11:30am CET

Consuming Open-source: A maintainer's perspective
The open-source ecosystem poses different challenges for the consumers and maintainers. How do consumers know which open-source projects they can trust in their projects? How do maintainers handle their hobby projects evolving into a widespread, critical dependency? What happens to abandoned projects? This talk will highlight these problems, and also showcase some of the work that the Node.js Package Maintenance team is doing to try and help solve these problems in the Node.js ecosystem.

Speakers

Saturday February 20, 2021 11:30am - 11:55am CET
Session Room 2

11:30am CET

Testing extensions for Visual Studio Code
Visual Studio Code is an extremely popular editor and has a very rich ecosystem of extensions. However, testing these extensions is rather tricky in practice. Often extensions require external resources which have to be injected into the development environment. Unit tests are quite bad at testing the UI itself, as they require extensive setup code and a lot of mocking (= implementation of the production API in the testing environment that exposes the same interface). Checking the results of them still requires one to manually verify that the UI looks correct. All this combined can easily lead to false-positives and false-negatives. Integration tests on the other hand are not a silver bullet either as they can be rather brittle, slow, lengthy to write, hard to set up while also not being able to cover edge-cases very efficiently.
This talk will focus on what we learned while developing the Open Build Service Connector: which testing strategies work, which don't and what tools to use. We will cover some viable approaches to unit testing and the vscode-extension-tester module that we used for integration tests.

Speakers

Saturday February 20, 2021 11:30am - 11:55am CET
Session Room 1

11:30am CET

Preventing catastrophes using OpenShift data
There are many things you can do when you have loads of data from running OpenShift clusters. Especially if you have some imagination, inspiration and understanding of the product. The data gives you the ability to understand customer problems and to see the future of your support organization. In this presentation, we will share anecdotes of what Red Hat engineers found in cluster health data and what impact these findings had. We will also show the engineers from OpenShift community in the audience how they can consume the benefits of our work and use data to improve their OpenShift components.

Speakers
avatar for Ivan Nečas

Ivan Nečas

Software Architect, Red Hat
Ivan Nečas currently works as an architect for connected customer experience program, working on tooling for better supportability of on-premise solutions, with focus on OpenShift in the first phase. Twitter: https://twitter.com/iNecas
avatar for Jan Zeleny

Jan Zeleny

Senior Manager, Engineering, Red Hat
Jan is a long time Red Hatter and team builder, having built three teams almost from scratch. He is passionate about communication between engineers and their stakeholder and about giving structure to unstructured things.


Saturday February 20, 2021 11:30am - 12:10pm CET
Session Room 5

11:30am CET

Automation anywhere by customising Robot Framework
Robot Framework is a generic open-source, Python-based, widely used automation framework. It is an extensible keyword-driven automation framework, useful for acceptance testing, acceptance test-driven development (ATDD), behavior-driven development (BDD), and robotic process automation (RPA). It can be used in distributed, heterogeneous environments, where automation requires using different technologies and interfaces. In the Robot Framework and all of its libraries, they really do a lot to meet the versatile product requirements.

In case to meet specific functionality that does not handle in the existing libraries of robot framework, customizing robot framework is the best solution. This proposal will brighten the idea of how to use the Robot framework to make automation possible for any product. It will cover the generic design to extend the Robot framework which will be applicable for any custom product. The concept of extending the existing framework will support non-existing functionality from a wide range of products and provides the feasibility of test automation in any project. The demo example will add a practical implementation of the presented design. Also, this demo will cover how to create a project-specific framework using the Robot framework.

The talk will initially cover the revisionary introduction of the robot framework however detailed basics of the Robot framework will be out of scope. The major focus will be on the understanding of how to design and implement robot framework customization, to make the test automation feasible for any custom product.

Speakers

Saturday February 20, 2021 11:30am - 12:10pm CET
Session Room 4

11:30am CET

Enarx for Confidential Computing
Enarx is an open source project to allow you to deploy sensitive workloads on untrusted hosts in the public cloud, private cloud, Edge, IoT - wherever! We use TEEs (Trusted Execution Environments) such as Intel's SGX and AMD's SEV to deploy into "Keeps", confidentiality and integrity protected WebAssembly run-times. In this talk, we'll give a demo of the latest state, and discuss architecture and some of the more tricky implementation details. A knowledge of systems programming, Rust, micro-kernels, syscalls, WebAssembly, trust management or distributed client-server architecture might be helpful, but we don't expect you to be an expert in all (or any!) of them.

Speakers
avatar for Mike Bursell

Mike Bursell

Intel Corp
Dad, CofE priest, husband, knitter, geek, YA author, cyberpunk fan.
avatar for Nathaniel McCallum

Nathaniel McCallum

Senior Principal Software Engineer, Red Hat, Inc.
Nathaniel is a Principal Software Engineer for Red Hat's Security and Identity group. By day, he tackles tough security problems. By night, he tackles his five children. He is the author of a variety of security related technologies, including: 2FA for Fr


Saturday February 20, 2021 11:30am - 12:10pm CET
Session Room 3

11:30am CET

Using source-git to maintain RPM packages
Source-git repositories are forks of the upstream projects, with a few select branches tracking downstream (distribution) patches and packaging paraphernalia as Git commits.

This format allows packagers to tweak code during packaging activities using the same format as upstream projects do and get rid of the friction of handling upstream code and downstream patches as separate entities, as the canonical dist-git format does.

During this workshop we will work through the most common steps of maintaining packages in Fedora and/or CentOS Stream using source-git, starting with setting up source-git repositories, proposing and accepting downstream changes, rebasing on new upstream releases and syncing source-git repositories to dist-git so that code is built for the distribution.

An example repository for the workshop will be provided, though we encourage you to bring one of your own packages and we will help you set things up and try out the workflow!

Speakers
avatar for Tomas Tomecek

Tomas Tomecek

Principal Software Engineer, Red Hat
packit, containers, automation, and having all the fun
avatar for František Lachman

František Lachman

Software engineer, Red Hat, FI MUNI Brno
Python developer, Red-Hatter, teacher at FI MU, scout and climber.


Saturday February 20, 2021 11:30am - 12:10pm CET
x Workshop Room

11:30am CET

NetworkManager Community Meetup DevConf.CZ 2021
Let's meet and discuss any questions or suggestions related to NetworkManager.

There is no fixed schedule or agenda. It will be an open discussion.

https://networkmanager.pages.freedesktop.org/
mailing-list: networkmanager-list@gnome.org
IRC: #nm on freenode

Speakers
TH

Thomas Haller

Software Engineer, Red Hat
NetworkManager developer


Saturday February 20, 2021 11:30am - 12:30pm CET
x Meetup Room

12:00pm CET

#Junioring101 - How Not To Go Bonkers At The Start
Summary:

How to be successful in your first technical position? How to boost your learning? How to get all the support you need from your colleagues without taking up their whole time? These are just some of the questions every junior is grappling with. Whether you've graduated from a technical university, changed careers or are self-taught, your first job will have a critical impact on your future. It will help you create your work and learning habits, propel you into a particular development path, and last but not least - it will help you build a network of peers which will be critical to your future in the field. Make the most of it.

In this session you will learn:

- tips & tricks for boosting your learning
- some of the most important skills nobody talks about in school
- the importance of managing your mentors and reviewers
- how to approach time-boxing
- what it means to take responsibility for task delivery
- how to make it easier for your senior colleagues to help you
- the critical skill of managing your own well-being

I will share with you the experience I've earned while working in my first engineering role after changing careers - and the experience of my friends and colleagues who have been struggling with the same topics, so you won't have to reinvent the wheel and fully enjoy the challenging job that you're doing.

Audience:

This talk is aimed at people starting their career in the field of Software Engineering and Web Development - regardless of whether they are DevOps, SREs, developers, operators, or testers. The techniques are applicable for people at every level of seniority, though. Based on my experience technical seniority doesn't always correspond to non-technical seniority (and skills like team work, time management, continuous learning, and communication).

Motivation Behind The Talk:

Based on my first-hand experience as a junior I wrote a blog post with tips&tricks for my fellow colleagues struggling in their first technical position. The post gathered more attention than I expected and has been shared in the Czech tech community earlier this year. I think there's a space for content addressing the struggles of juniors - while there are plenty of resources helping get the first job, not many people talk about what it takes to be successful and happy after landing the job. I'd like to address that need.

Speakers

Saturday February 20, 2021 12:00pm - 12:25pm CET
Session Room 2

12:00pm CET

Fully Automated Dynamic Analysis of RPM packages
It is easy to statically analyze source code of RPM packages. Fedora contains a tool named csmock, which takes a source RPM package, runs static analyzers on it, and returns a list of potential programming mistakes detected in the package. We are extending this fully automated solution for dynamic analyzers, such as valgrind or strace. Using this extension, one can easily get a list of bugs detected by valgrind in the regression tests embedded in a source RPM package. Thanks to our innovative approach, the results do not contain unrelated reports that would otherwise be produced by bash, make, python interpreter, and all the external testing frameworks.


Saturday February 20, 2021 12:00pm - 12:25pm CET
Session Room 1

12:15pm CET

Connecting Kubernetes clusters with Submariner
One of the requirements of traditional hybrid cloud is seamless connectivity between multiple clouds. That has historically been difficult, so modern hybrid cloud has moved away from that, focusing instead on building applications that can move seamlessly between environments. However, there are still many cases where connectivity between clouds is desirable, and setting up individual connectivity between applications or services hosted in different clouds quickly becomes unmanageable.

Submariner is an upstream project which provides seamless connectivity between Kubernetes clusters. Once it's deployed, applications in one cluster can transparently access services exported from other clusters, even in clusters with conflicting network setups (overlapping subnets in particular).

This session will provide an overview of what Submariner provides for end users, and a brief description of how it works. It will include a detailed demo of Submariner deployment on multiple clusters, and service deployment across clusters, including round-robin access to services available in multiple clusters.

Attendees are expected to have some familiarity with cloud concepts and Kubernetes terminology such as services, nodes and pods. They will discover how to deploy and use Submariner to connect Kubernetes clusters.

Speakers
avatar for Stephen Kitt

Stephen Kitt

Red Hat
Stephen Kitt est un aficionado des logiciels libres ; il les utilise depuis 1992. Il a contribué à plusieurs projets libres, dont le noyau Linux. Il est développeur Debian depuis 2013. En 2015 il a rejoint Red Hat pour travailler à temps plein sur OpenDaylight, une plateforme... Read More →


Saturday February 20, 2021 12:15pm - 12:40pm CET
Session Room 5

12:15pm CET

Failover from OpenStack to AWS in BaseOS CI/TFT
The Testing Farm Team has been fighting an unreliable testing infrastructure for years. Last year we got the possibility of a failover from our internal OpenStack cloud to the public cloud (AWS). In this session, we will guide you through our journey of adding a transparent failover functionality to our CI pipeline, with AWS complementing an OpenStack tenant. We will look at the requirements on the AWS cloud in terms of connecting it to the internal infrastructure and at the main features of our open-source provisioner Artemis, which made this failover possible: a programmable routing mechanism. In addition to the actual provisioning, Artemis also shields us from short-lasting infrastructure outages, which previously caused irrecoverable failures in our CI pipeline. In the end, we would like to show you how you can take advantage of Artemis for your own benefit and share the interim plans of adding support for additional public clouds, Beaker, and more features planned by the team.

Speakers
avatar for Miroslav Vadkerti

Miroslav Vadkerti

Senior Prinicipal Quality Engineer, Red Hat
I work on Continuous Integration for RHEL. I am the co-author of https://github.com/gluetool/gluetool and Testing Farm.


Saturday February 20, 2021 12:15pm - 12:40pm CET
Session Room 4

12:15pm CET

Security benefits of using FreeIPA/IDM
In the presentation we will cover:
1. What is FreeIPA
2. What are use-cases [Integrations]
3. Security benefits of FreeIPA, i.e how IPA can be used to build security within Environment
4. Future scope of FreeIPA moving forward

Speakers

Saturday February 20, 2021 12:15pm - 12:40pm CET
Session Room 3

12:30pm CET

Leading and Growing an Open Source Community
This presentation targets an audience of advanced practitioners - learners who are already contributing to an open-source community in a leadership position and want to be able to lead and grow the community more effectively.

These learners may be asking questions like:
- Why do people choose to lead open source projects and communities?
- What's the difference between participating in and leading a project?
- How can I ensure a community grows sustainably?
- How can I spread the word about this project or community?
- What type of a leadership structure does a community require?

This presentation is best for audiences who want to develop a "long-term vision" for their open source community but might not know how to begin. At the conclusion of this experience, participants will be able to:
- Describe key differences between community participation and community leadership
- Recognize challenges that new community leaders can face
- Identify strategies for both increasing and sustaining community participation
- Understand how to measure the success of community involvement and how to communicate that success to others

Speakers
avatar for Sayak Sarkar

Sayak Sarkar

Senior Software Engineer, Red Hat, Inc.
Open Source Evangelist, Tech NerdWorks as a Senior Software Engineer at Red Hathttps://sayak.in


Saturday February 20, 2021 12:30pm - 12:55pm CET
Session Room 2

12:30pm CET

Colliding branes of Quarkus
With its innovative application composition process, Quarkus exposes different kinds of APIs to the applications both at build time and runtime. These API branes, like the ones proposed by string theory, occasionally collide and a new universe full of quarks is born - Quarkus is released. Why do the laws of physics work the way they do in this new universe? Very much depends on the way the branes collided - what versions of the libraries went into the release and how much their API and behavior has changed.

In this talk we're going to take a look at how Quarkus has started to use Revapi to try and understand, report on and process the API changes that happen in both Quarkus itself as well as the libraries it incorporates and makes available as all of them evolve across the releases.

What you'll learn:
* where the APIs are in Quarkus
* how they're reported on
* what measures are taken against accidentally changing the API
* maybe some fun ways in which API can be broken, if time permits

Speakers

Saturday February 20, 2021 12:30pm - 12:55pm CET
Session Room 1

12:30pm CET

Getting Started with Fedora CoreOS: A Hands-On Lab
This is a hands-on workshop that will introduce Fedora CoreOS (an emerging Fedora Edition) and explain the differences between Fedora CoreOS and traditional Linux operating system distributions. In this lab you'll become familiar with the components of Fedora CoreOS and also the value this automatically updating container focused OS provides. By the end you'll be ready to deploy Fedora CoreOS in your infrastructure and contribute back to the growing Fedora CoreOS community.

We will be covering the following key topics in the hands-on portion of the workshop:

Key Topics:

- Provisioning with Ignition
- Using the Fedora CoreOS Config Transpiler
- Booting Fedora CoreOS for the first time
- Booting on a Cloud (AWS)
- Running provisioning scripts and containers on boot
- Understanding how updates work
- Performing rollback when needed

In order to perform this lab at home the user will need:

- An internet connection capable of downloading large files
- A Linux system with KVM support and libvirt installed and running
- The system must be able to start the VM with at least 2GiB of RAM and 10GiB of disk space and a few VCPUs

Participants will be provided AWS credits to follow the lab with the Cloud demo.


Saturday February 20, 2021 12:30pm - 1:10pm CET
x Workshop Room

12:45pm CET

What new features are in Podman?
In this session, you can hear Dan Walsh talk about the newest features of podman, a tool for managing OCI containers and pods.

Many things have changed since the 1.7.0 release, such as:
* The new podman API and how it's integrated with docker-py and docker-compose
* Improved integration with systemd
* Latest changes to networking, such as rootless support and `podman network` command
* And much more!

With a live demo!

Speakers
avatar for Daniel Walsh

Daniel Walsh

Senior Distinguished Engineer, Red Hat, Inc.
Daniel Walsh has worked in the computer security field for over 30 years. Dan is a Consulting Engineer at Red Hat. He joined Red Hat in August 2001. Dan leads the Red Hat Container Engineering team since August 2013, but has been working on container tec


Saturday February 20, 2021 12:45pm - 1:25pm CET
Session Room 5

12:45pm CET

openQA - end to end testing of operating systems
openQA is an integration testing framework for whole operating systems. It can perform the same actions that a human would perform when interacting with the system under test, only in an automated fashion. This can be leveraged to continuously test repetitive tasks, like the installer of a Linux distribution. It is used extensively by both the Fedora and openSUSE distributions to continuously test their latest images.
This talk will introduce openQA, its basic concepts, where it is applicable and showcase some more advanced features (like testing on bare metal hardware). It is aimed at beginners and will show you whether it is applicable for your use case while also providing some instructions how to start using it.

Speakers

Saturday February 20, 2021 12:45pm - 1:25pm CET
Session Room 4

12:45pm CET

Using RHEL built-in Security Technologies daily
In this session we are going to show you how easy it can be to raise the security of your system using readily available technologies. We will guide you through it via a presentation and demos which will enable you to set up an environment capable of allowing users to do certain administrative actions, rejecting unwanted usb devices or allowing only trusted application to be executed, automatically unlocking encrypted drives at boot time under specific conditions or collecting system logs centrally over a secure channel. We are also going to shed some light on the efforts we devote to keeping and even improving the level of quality RHEL is known for.

Speakers
avatar for Dalibor Pospisil

Dalibor Pospisil

QE engineer, Red Hat


Saturday February 20, 2021 12:45pm - 1:25pm CET
Session Room 3

1:00pm CET

Putting the Doc in DevDocTest
DevDocTest - or the agile practice of creating code synchronously with the user documentation of the code, and handing over both to be tested together - is an excellent theoretical concept, with many benefits for everyone involved. It makes the development more focused, the testing easier, the documentation more accurate, and more. However, putting all this into practice can be rather tricky, and especially in larger teams, escaping the traditional waterfall workflow requires a lot of effort, and faces many pitfalls.

This talk will briefly introduce the basics of DevDocTest, and then recount a tech writer's experience with creating user documentation in lock-step with development and testers. This will include practical tips of what worked, what turned out to be not such a good idea, and how the overall experience differed from the waterfall approach.

The ultimate aim is for the audience - and especially the documentation writers among them - to learn whether DevDocTest is a viable workflow model for their teams, and if so, then how best to go about making it a reality.

Speakers
avatar for Jiri Herrmann

Jiri Herrmann

Technical Writer, Red Hat
A tech writer for Red Hat Enterprise Linux, a film enthusiast, and an avid nerd.


Saturday February 20, 2021 1:00pm - 1:25pm CET
Session Room 1

1:00pm CET

Building Fedora layered container images
The OpenShift Build Service (OSBS) is a collection of tools, workflows and integration points that build and release layered container images.
OSBS is used with Fedora's build system (koji) to build the layered images shipped in registry.fedoraproject.org.
In this session, we will give you an overview of what happens behind the
curtains when a container image build is triggered in the Fedora
infrastructure and what you need to do to include an image in
registry.fedoraproject.org.

Speakers

Saturday February 20, 2021 1:00pm - 1:25pm CET
Session Room 2

1:30pm CET

Break
Saturday February 20, 2021 1:30pm - 2:00pm CET
Main Stage

2:00pm CET

Beyond k8s Monitoring: Data to Knowledge to Action
Since a typical kubernetes cluster consists of a lot of moving parts, there are many ways in which it could break. Therefore monitoring tools such as prometheus are often used to collect usage and health metrics from deployments. However, when there are thousands of deployments in your fleet, inspecting health metrics from individual deployments to diagnose the issues in them becomes tedious and inefficient.

In this talk, we will talk about how we applied data science to the health metrics collected from OpenShift clusters to help us proactively identify issues. Specifically, we used clustering to form groups of deployments that behave similarly. Then, we applied frequent pattern mining to determine the prominent, 'defining' patterns in each group. These patterns can help us precisely identify and codify the problem affecting the deployments. In this way, we can diagnose issues proactively and scalably. We found that in many cases, the patterns determined by these methods coincide very well with the rules developed by SMEs. Therefore, we believe these techniques can be used to generate actionable insights going forward if added as an extension to your existing monitoring system.

Speakers
KC

Karanraj Chauhan

Software Engineer, Red Hat
I like math, machine learning, and deep learning. Big fan of CPUs, GPUs, FPGAs, and other such lightning powered stones.


Saturday February 20, 2021 2:00pm - 2:25pm CET
Session Room 5

2:00pm CET

Always present type information thanks to BPF: BTF
The presence of compact type information brought initially by the needs of BPF
allows for more and more tools to use it seamlessly.

This talk will show what has been accomplished so far in the BTF (BPF Type
Information) camp, from improvements in its generation from DWARF, overcoming
compiler bugs and speeding up the tool used to encode the kernel BTF
information, pahole.

The kernel now has all its types always available at /sys/kernel/btf/vmlinux
and at devconf.cz 2021 time all its modules will be in that sysfs hierarchy
with the advent of split BTF.

The new raw pretty printing features of pahole will be demonstrated, where
things like raw arrays of structs can be fed to it plus the type name to use in
decoding stdin, all sorts of heuristics and back references are used to grok
complex data files.

The kernel also now have snprintf routines that use BTF for use in debugging
and tracing, bpftrace and bpftool use it and examples of such usage will be
shown.

Speakers
avatar for Arnaldo Melo

Arnaldo Melo

Principal Software Engineer, Red Hat Inc.
Maintained IPX, LLC, Appletalk protocols. Refactored the TCP/IP stack to reuse non TCP specific parts. Implemented the Linux DCCP stack. Created pahole, a tool to help in optimizing data structures, used in Linux, glibc, KDE, xine & others. Maintainer of ‘perf’ (profiling, tracing... Read More →


Saturday February 20, 2021 2:00pm - 2:25pm CET
Session Room 1

2:00pm CET

Fedora Community Outreach Revamp
The Fedora Project has been a diverse project since its advent. Fedora has been shipping Workstations, Servers, Cloud, and IoT operating systems as well as many more amazing things to engage developers, users, and innovators worldwide. In earlier years, Fedora outreach was primarily executed by a group of people referred to as Fedora Ambassadors. The Ambassador Program has had many success stories of community growth during its 15+ year history.
However, as time moved on the program began to grow, but not scale and adapt. Different bodies of governance within Fedora had different ideas of how things should be run. With no scalability, participation in the program declined. This year, we see a pandemic sweeping across the globe and all events have gone virtual. There has been no better time to revamp the Fedora Ambassadors program, as well as the entirety of Fedora's Community Outreach teams.
The Fedora Action Impact Coordinator, Marie Nordin, created a team formulated of two co-leads, Mariana Balla and Sumantro Mukherjee, and a group of volunteers (Temporary Task Force (TTF)). This team will work to address the historical pain points, create a new vision for community outreach in 2020, and re-engage the various teams & the Fedora community.
Attendees of this talk will learn about how we got here, how we came up with a proposal for change, and how it is being executed. We welcome anyone interested in Fedora, community, and outreach. Attendees can get insights into the Fedora Ambassador overhaul, learn how to get involved, and give constructive suggestions to help the Community Outreach Revamp succeed.

Speakers
MB

Mariana Balla

Community Manager, phpList
My name is Mariana, I come from Albania and since 2016 I am an open source advocate. I hold a MA degree in Information Technology granted by the Faculty of Natural Sciences, University of Tirana. Currently, I am working as a Community Manager for phpList an open source email marketing... Read More →
MN

Marie Nordin

Fedora Community Action and Impact Coordinator, Red Hat - The Fedora Project


Saturday February 20, 2021 2:00pm - 2:25pm CET
Session Room 2

2:00pm CET

Effective API schemas testing
Many modern Web applications use API schemas to describe their contracts. But, the presence of a schema doesn't mean that the real application works as defined in the schema. There are many reasons for that - from the fundamental inability to describe the application with the chosen schema spec to the ubiquitous human factor. There are many consequences from this problem, and the application crash is the least dangerous of them.
I will talk about Schemathesis - a tool that helps to solve many of these problems with property-based testing.
We'll go through typical use-cases and talk about stateful testing - an approach that allows you to generate whole sequences of API calls automatically.
You'll learn how to test API schemas with minimal efforts and create effective test scenarios that will make your applications more reliable.
If you are interested in the practical usage of property-based testing and how to implement it in real-life projects, I am keen to see you at the session!

Speakers
avatar for Dmitry Dygalo

Dmitry Dygalo

Software Engineering Consultant
I love Python, PostgreSQL, testing and building cool stuff


Saturday February 20, 2021 2:00pm - 2:25pm CET
Session Room 4

2:00pm CET

Closing gaps in strong auth: FIDO2 device support
Over the past few years, major websites started offering a 2-factor authentication option based on hardware devices. The latest effort in this area is FIDO2, which comprises two closely related standards: WebAuthn for communicating between websites and a client (web browser), and CTAP2 (Client To Authenticator Protocol) for interacting with authenticator devices.

On the client side, however, there is still room for improvement. Although major web browsers have already adopted the CTAP2 protocol, they currently require direct access to the devices through a low-level transport such as USB HID. This can be problematic when authentication is required inside an isolated environment, such as in a sandbox or container: the application provider would have to request full access to USB, whereas its usage is sorely for user authentication.

To mitigate this situation, we have implemented a proxy service that allows applications to access CTAP2 authenticator devices in a secure manner. With this service, the host has fine grained access control over authenticator devices, while the applications can take advantage of the device discovery mechanism provided by the host. In this talk, we will look at the design of the proxy service considering potential use-cases and challenges in terms of security. If time allows, we will show a demonstration using the current state of implementation.

Speakers
avatar for Daiki Ueno

Daiki Ueno

Senior Software Engineer, Red Hat
Daiki Ueno is a programmer in the crypto team at Red Hat, where he works on TLS libraries including NSS and GnuTLS.


Saturday February 20, 2021 2:00pm - 2:25pm CET
Session Room 3

2:00pm CET

Hands-on conversion of CentOS to RHEL
In this lab we’ll walk you through converting your CentOS 8 systems to Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 using an open-source conversion utility called Convert2RHEL. You will not only try the simplest one-command solution that does all the magic but also learn how to run this remotely through Ansible.

Speakers
avatar for Michal Boček

Michal Boček

Senior Software Engineer, Red Hat
Michal is a Senior Software Engineer working at Red Hat for five years. He has developed the Convert2RHEL utility that migrates Oracle Linux and CentOS systems to RHEL and now has been leading the team behind it. He also spent couple of years developing the RHEL 7 to 8 upgrade LEAPP... Read More →


Saturday February 20, 2021 2:00pm - 2:40pm CET
x Workshop Room

2:00pm CET

Telco; Networking; Architecture; How to debug; Tips and Tricks
Telco 5G, 4G and even home networking is converging rapidly towards OSP and OCP. There are many complex layers that need to work together to get things working. The complexity creates many challenges for debugging in trial labs and at end customer's data centers.
In this session we will share our Tips and Tricks and tool bag of how to debug this complex environment.
We will talk about new projects and debug tools that might be helpful.

Speakers
avatar for Rashid Khan

Rashid Khan

Director Networking, Red Hat
Red hat networking team out of westford


Saturday February 20, 2021 2:00pm - 3:00pm CET
x Meetup Room

2:30pm CET

Processing OpenShift 4 health data at scale
Using large amounts of continuously incoming data to make better decisions is a tricky task. The challenges start with ingesting data streams coming with thousands of clusters into a single place and end with a properly scalable tool to display the information extracted from the data. But there are also many components in between that ensure proper stability and scalability of the data processing pipeline. As a cherry on top, this all needs to be orchestrated so that the data is processed timely and no data is lost in the process. In this presentation, we will analyze the anatomy of OpenShift-based infrastructure for large-scale data processing that backs Red Hat Insights, a program to process, analyze and present customer analytics data.

Speakers
avatar for Pavel Tisnovsky

Pavel Tisnovsky

Quality Engineer, Red Hat
Pavel is famous for his in-depth articles he writes on various technical topics for the Czech Linux magazine root.cz. He'd taught computer graphics at Brno Technical University and worked as a C, C++, and Java developer in various companies before he joined Red Hat where he was a... Read More →


Saturday February 20, 2021 2:30pm - 2:55pm CET
Session Room 5

2:30pm CET

State of Fedora, 2021
Fedora Project Leader presents the traditional "State of Fedora" address, including current activity, future plans, and how you can get involved (and what that involvement can do for you!).

Speakers
avatar for Matthew Miller

Matthew Miller

Fedora Project Leader


Saturday February 20, 2021 2:30pm - 2:55pm CET
Session Room 2

2:30pm CET

Building Petabyte Scale ML Models with Python
Abstract

Although building ML models on small/ toy data-set is easy, most production-grade problems involve massive datasets which current ML practices don't scale to. In this talk, we cover how you can drastically increase the amount of data that your models can learn from using distributed data/ml pipes.

It can be difficult to figure out how to work with large data-sets (which do not fit in your RAM), even if you're already comfortable with ML libraries/ APIs within python. Many questions immediately come up: Which library should I use, and why? What's the difference between a 'map-reduce' and a 'task-graph'? What's a partial fit function, and what format does it expect the data in? Is it okay for my training data to have more features than observations? What's the appropriate machine learning model to use? And so on...

In this talk, we'll answer all those questions, and more!

We'll start by walking through the current distributed analytics (out-of-core learning) landscape in order to understand the pain-points and some solutions to this problem.

Here is a sketch of a system designed to achieve this goal (of building scalable ML models):

1. a way to stream instances
2. a way to extract features from instances
3. an incremental algorithm

Then we'll read a large dataset into Dask, Tensorflow (tf.data) & sklearn streaming, and immediately apply what we've learned about in last section. We'll move on to the model building process, including a discussion of which model is most appropriate for the task. We'll evaluate our model a few different ways, and then examine the model for greater insight into how the data is influencing its predictions. Finally, we'll practice this entire workflow on a new dataset, and end with a discussion of which parts of the process are worth tuning for improved performance.

Detailed Outline

1. Intro to out-of-core learning
2. Representing large datasets as instances
3. Transforming data (in batches) - live code [3-5]
4. Feature Engineering & Scaling
5. Building and evaluating a model (on entire datasets)
6. Practicing this workflow on another dataset
7. Benchmark other libraries/ for OOC learning
8. Questions and Answers

Key takeaway

By the end of the talk participants would know how to build petabyte scale ML models, beyond the shackles of conventional python libraries.

Participants would have a benchmarks and best case practices for building such ML models at scale.

Speakers
avatar for Vaibhav Srivastav

Vaibhav Srivastav

Data Scientist, Deloitte Consulting LLP
Hi! I am a Data Scientist working with Deloitte Consulting LLP, I work with Fortune Technology 10 clients to help them make data-driven (profitable) decisions. In my surplus time I serve as a Subject Matter Expert on Google Cloud Platform to help build scalable, resilient and fault... Read More →


Saturday February 20, 2021 2:30pm - 2:55pm CET
Session Room 4

2:30pm CET

Conntrack offload: why and how
Conntrack is a subsystem from netfilter that enables features like NAT and is one that wasn't reachable from the tc subsystem yet. This talk will explain why that bridge was made and how one can leverage it, with or without Open vSwitch.

Speakers
avatar for Marcelo Leitner

Marcelo Leitner

Principla Software Engineer, Red Hat


Saturday February 20, 2021 2:30pm - 2:55pm CET
Session Room 3

2:30pm CET

But First, the Team!
Want great open source technologies? It takes a great team! Enter Bruce Tuckman's phases of team development - a model that's stood the test of time because it remains highly relevant and beneficial. If you are a leader (or aspire to be one), a member of a team (or may be in one in the future), or are just looking to develop your skills, this unique talk (based on Tuckman's model) will give you a practical framework with actionable tips for working in and leading teams successfully. You'll learn about the five phases - Forming, Storming, Norming, Performing, and Adjourning - including detailed descriptions of each along with proven strategies for addressing challenges or issues which may occur along the way. You'll understand how to use the model to your advantage by effectively navigating all of the phases, from team set-up to the after-party!

Speakers
avatar for Scott Graffius

Scott Graffius

Founder and CEO, Exceptional PPM and PMO Solutions
Scott M. Graffius is an agile project management consultant, practitioner, award-winning author, and keynote speaker. Content from his books, speaking engagements, and more has been featured and used by media outlets, publications, businesses, governments, and universities including... Read More →


Saturday February 20, 2021 2:30pm - 3:10pm CET
Session Room 1

3:00pm CET

OpenShift for low latency and real time workloads
I am going to present an end to end story about how an OpenShift cluster can be configured and used to support real-time and/or latency sensitive applications. This capability is useful for many modern industries including signal processing and telecommunications (audio and video processing, software defined radio), Industry 4.0 (smart software controlling machines and factories) and others.

The session will explain what issues you need to overcome to really limit the interruptions to your low latency application, how to do that using the OpenShift cluster and then how to utilize the low latency capability in your application. I will also touch on how such an application should look like to fully benefit from this low latency tuning and how a proper configuration of the cluster can be verified.

This talk would benefit end users, developers, systems administrators, DevOps, architects, who are interested in introduction to best practices of deploying latency sensitive workloads on Openshift.

Speakers
avatar for Martin Sivak

Martin Sivak

Senior Software Engineer, Red Hat
Martin has been working for Red Hat (Brno, Czech Republic) for the past eight years. He spent most of the time working in the installer team and now he is part of a team responsible for the scheduling and quality of service efforts in oVirt. He has a master degree in the field of... Read More →


Saturday February 20, 2021 3:00pm - 3:25pm CET
Session Room 5

3:00pm CET

Invention is a collective action
The stereotypical image of an inventor is a lone person working in their garage, bedroom, or laboratory. But even when some specific invention is the product of a single mind, it springs from a long chain of precursors, without which it wouldn't be possible. Furthermore, much invention is essentially social. Even in the absence of explicit sharing and collective innovation as in the case of open source software, there's a diffusion of invention and innovation going back to the 19th-century iron and steel industry--where it's been studied--and almost certainly long before. My talk would go into examples of both building on prior work and collaborative innovation.

Speakers
avatar for Gordon Haff

Gordon Haff

Technology Evangelist, Red Hat
Gordon Haff is Technology Evangelist at Red Hat where he works on emerging technology product strategy; writes about tech, trends, and their business impact; and is a frequent speaker at customer and industry events. Among the topics he tries to keep up with are DevOps, IoT, blockchain... Read More →


Saturday February 20, 2021 3:00pm - 3:25pm CET
Session Room 2

3:00pm CET

Stateful Sessions for Intelligent Apps
Live audio transcription and other similar applications require stateful processing to support both multi-user sessions and dynamic scale-out. We can persist audio state with a Kafka kappa architecture, but that state must also be preserved across the OpenShift cluster boundary to user web clients. Fortunately, OpenShift's load balancing features allow stateful sessions to be implemented without complicated custom configurations.

In this talk, Gage will explain how to convert your single user constrained application to support stateful sessions with any number of users. Using the power of OpenShift and Open Data Hub's data monitoring and streaming tools, a stateful architecture can be developed and managed easily. We will showcase a real-time audio transcription use case, including a Kafka streaming architecture, in a practical data science application.

Speakers
avatar for Gage Krumbach

Gage Krumbach

AICoE FDE Intern, RedHat


Saturday February 20, 2021 3:00pm - 3:25pm CET
Session Room 4

3:00pm CET

Get start with XDP: write a network filter in 10m
XDP and eBPF are getting popular, it's performance has giant improvement compared with iptables. In this session, we will show how to write a small XDP network filter. This session is for audiences who are not familiar with XDP, but want to know how to write a XDP program. The listener should familiar with C and network packet format.

Speakers
avatar for Hangbin Liu

Hangbin Liu

Senior Software Engineer
Red Hat software engineer


Saturday February 20, 2021 3:00pm - 3:25pm CET
Session Room 3

3:00pm CET

Host your own PyPI
In this workshop you will learn how to install Pulp3 and use it for sync packages from PyPI, manage packages (add your own package), and distribute your own repository.

We use a pulp-installer with a pre-built container (https://github.com/pulp/pulp_installer).

You will learn how to:
- install Pulp3
- sync PyPI (only packages by your choice)
- add your own package to your synced repo
- distribute your repo
- install package from your mirror

Requirements:
- docker
- vagrant
- git

* building your own python package is not included.


Saturday February 20, 2021 3:00pm - 3:40pm CET
x Workshop Room

3:15pm CET

Words Matter
Open source technology is better, faster, and more creative because of the diverse perspectives and experiences that are represented in its communities. If open source is truly meant to be inclusive and a place where anyone can participate, it must be welcoming to all.

If any person or groups of people feel unwelcome because of the language being used in a community, code or documentation, then the words should change. We can choose words that are precise, not dependent on metaphors, and convey messages without negative connotations.

We will discuss the process of auditing our own work - our code, documentation and content - and identifying potentially divisive language. We will also talk about methods to standardize replacements and collaborate with writers and developers to carry out these changes in a sustainable way.

Working to eradicate problematic language from our open source code and documentation is just one action in a larger effort of diversity and inclusion. For open source to continue to be the best way to create better solutions faster, we must break down any barrier that could potentially inhibit participation and make the documentation and development process more inclusive for all.


Saturday February 20, 2021 3:15pm - 3:55pm CET
Session Room 1

3:30pm CET

The ABC of Container-Image Management
In early November 2020, Docker Hub initiated a rate limit. Since then, we can pull at most 200 images within 6 hours. While many CI/CD and even production systems around the globe went south, we could quickly establish a working solution without scanning hundreds of thousands of lines of code for images that may be pulled from docker.io and moving them somewhere else. All we had to do was to add a couple of lines to a config file. You want to know how? Continue reading!

The container tools Podman, Buildah, Skopeo and CRI-O are well known to the DevConf community but there are many lesser known golden nuggets for managing images that we want to share.

- How can we copy dozens, hundreds or thousands of images with a single command?
- How can we configure and use registry mirrors?
- How can we reference images by short names and yet be secure?
- How can we block registries entirely?

Speakers
avatar for Valentin Rothberg

Valentin Rothberg

Red Hat
Valentin is a principal software engineer in Red Hat's container engines team. He works on a couple of core libraries and container tools such as Podman, Buildah, CRI-O and Skopeo.


Saturday February 20, 2021 3:30pm - 3:55pm CET
Session Room 5

3:30pm CET

Computational Thinking for Creatives
Getting people to think about computation is just as important as teaching coding. At work I started a coding basics series for creative designers for our own digital transformation strategy. I realized that if I don’t explain to people about computational thinking then then coding won’t make much of a difference to them. This talk will review how a group of designers with zero coding experience were brought into computational thinking and how that enabled them to use coding in their projects.

Outline:

* What is computational thinking
* Why understanding computational thinking can help coding problem solving
* How to bridge the gap of learning to code for creatives like designers
* Establishing the thought process of sequential problem solving
* Prepare people to understand how to abstract problems down into steps
* Use visual aides and diagrams to help visual learners understand key concepts of computational thinking
* Leading from abstractions to problem solving with simple patterns
*With patterns people can build the basis for creating algorithms
* Case study of how HMC Architects used computational thinking and learning
* Company wide training for designers of diverse backgrounds
* Goals of creating training to learn to code while being mindful of different learning styles
* The results including how people were able to get a handle on coding due to computational thinking
* Review Key points and lessons learned

Speakers

Saturday February 20, 2021 3:30pm - 3:55pm CET
Session Room 2

3:30pm CET

Giving your user interfaces a voice
Microcopy is the text that makes up a large portion of the interfaces we surround us with.
Its power is often overlooked, but getting it right can actually make or break your UI.
Using consistent and clear labels and making sure you're using the words that fit the user best is just as important as the component you use or how you lay things out on the screen.
In this talk UX designer Andreas and content writers Shweta and Vendula will show how you can collaborate across professions to create great interfaces. While the UXD team works to understand the functionalities and to create the wire-frames, technical writers can join hands to provide intuitive Microcopy. They will also show both good and bad examples of writing in interfaces and will give you some simple tips on how you can become a better writer to improve your interfaces.

Speakers
AN

Andreas Nilsson

UX designer, Red Hat
Andreas is a designer at Red Hat and works primarily on the Cockpit project. He's been a GNOME contributor for the past 10 years.


Saturday February 20, 2021 3:30pm - 3:55pm CET
Session Room 4

3:30pm CET

Have you lost your node ... again?
Remote configuration of networking is a risky business. After you hit enter to set up your elaborate network, hopefully you will see the prompt blinking again after a couple of seconds of connectivity loss. But chances are, you won't get to see it ever again.

During this presentation we are going to discuss the resiliency of Kubernetes clusters and the risks of network configuration performed on day-2. We will follow by presenting Kubernetes nmstate, a tool for declarative cluster network configuration, and the mechanisms it uses to prevent and recover from connectivity loss.

The attendees should have at least a basic knowledge about Kubernetes.

The audience will walk away with a better understanding of the risks related to the configuration of the network of a Kubernetes cluster, and their mitigations.

Speakers
avatar for Petr Horáček

Petr Horáček

Senior Software Engineer, Red Hat
I work as a virtualization and container networking developer in Red Hat.


Saturday February 20, 2021 3:30pm - 3:55pm CET
Session Room 3

4:00pm CET

Wrap Up and Win Win Win!
Saturday February 20, 2021 4:00pm - 4:30pm CET
Main Stage
 
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